How could somebody have a better high school field hockey career than Allison Lancaster?

As a freshman at Skowhegan, Lancaster’s team went undefeated and won the state championship. The Indians also did it when she was a sophomore, a junior and a senior. That’s 76 straight wins — a new state record — and four Gold Balls in four years. After Skowhegan won the Class A state title this year, Lancaster capped her career by being named Miss Maine Field Hockey, the award given annually to the top senior player in the state.

Lancaster had 20 goals and 24 assists this season, and is the choice for the Morning Sentinel Field Hockey Player of the Year. Also considered were Skowhegan’s Mikayla Toth and Waterville’s Jena Nawfel.

Skowhegan coach Paula Doughty compares Lancaster in a sense to Bode Miller: Someone who is a little bit rebellious and on the edge, but knows when it’s time to focus.

“Allie is a typical youngest child,” Doughty said. “She’s a free spirit. She’s very social. Even when she was a little girl, she had an edge to her — she wasn’t like everybody else. At times I think it drove people crazy — especially her parents.”

“I wouldn’t say so much rebellious, but adventurous,” Lancaster said. “I’d always find a way to run away from my parents and explore new things. At the age of 9, I was doing Disney on my own.”

Some of this continued through high school. Before games, when Doughty was looking around and making sure everyone was focused, Lancaster would be dancing to the warmup music.

“Honestly, I’m just a very happy person,” Lancaster said, “and when music goes, I love to dance. I love to express myself and my happiness. Then when the game comes, my adrenaline and everything just comes on, and I focus it in. Then I start playing.”

When Lancaster started playing, that was always a good thing for Skowhegan. She combined the skills she was given and the ones she worked at to control the game as a center midfielder.

“She’s such an impact player,” Cony coach Holly Daigle said. “Her speed, and the way she could maneuver the ball was just amazing to watch. I’d rather be watching her when not playing her.”

“She’s fast as can be — fast as Forrest Gump,” Doughty said. “She’s got beautiful stickwork. She can see the whole field. She’s really grown into an amazing player. I was really, really proud of her this year. She showed amazing maturity, and growth, and leadership. She would come to practice every day and work her butt off.”

Lancaster’s all-out style sometimes led to some injuries. She runs off the list in her head: Rolled ankles (three times), a dislocated kneecap, a couple busted fingers, and a busted chin. Although she said she always felt 100 percent during games, she would feel the pain after the games, when the adrenaline wore off.

Lancaster’s last high school game was against Scarborough for the state final. The Indians had an off day as a team, but still rolled to a 4-1 victory.

“I was super nervous,” Lancaster said. “My nerves were flying through the roof. I always feel a little bit nervous before every game, but during the big games, I get so freaked out. Warmups, I’ll be nervous. My stomach will have butterflies all through it. But as soon as that ball is passed off, that first play, I’m into the game.”

Next fall, Lancaster will be playing at Providence. The Friars graduated only five of their 19 players from this year’s roster, so Lancaster expects to spend her freshman year learning and developing her game for coach Diane Madl.

“She saw me play as a back in Virginia Beach, and she was like, ‘Wow! You’re a really good back!’ But my speed kind of shows a forward potential,” Lancaster said. “Then again, both skills kind of point to mid, so she doesn’t really know yet.”

“She’s got a lot to offer,” Doughty said. “I think she’ll be an amazing player at Providence. I think it’s a good choice for her.”

“It’s been the perfect season, perfect field hockey career so far,” Lancaster said, “and I hope that it continues into Providence.”

Matt DiFilippo — 861-9243[email protected]Twitter: @Matt_DiFilippo