SIMI VALLEY, Calif. — He’s made 18,000 parachute jumps, helped train some of the world’s most elite skydivers, done some of the stunts for “Ironman 3.” But the plunge Luke Aikins knows he’ll be remembered for is the one he’s making without a parachute. Or a wingsuit.

Or anything, really, other than the clothes he’ll be wearing when he jumps out of an airplane at 25,000 feet this weekend, attempting to become the first person to land safely on the ground in a net.

The Fox network will broadcast the two-minute jump live at 8 p.m. Saturday as part of an hour-long TV special called “Heaven Sent.”

And, no, you don’t have to tell Aikins it sounds crazy. He knows that.

He said as much to his wife after a couple Hollywood guys looking to create the all-time-greatest reality TV stunt floated the idea by him.

“I said, ‘You won’t believe these guys,”‘ the affable skydiver recalls with a robust laugh. “‘They want me to jump out without a parachute.’ She said, ‘Oh, with a wingsuit.’ I said, ‘No, they want me to do it with nothing.’ We both had a good laugh about that.”

But in the weeks that followed he couldn’t shake one persistent thought: Could anybody actually do this and live to tell the tale?

Because if anyone could, Aikins wanted to be that guy.

After all, the 42-year-old daredevil has practically lived his life in the sky. He made his first tandem jump when he was 12, following with his first solo leap four years later. He’s been racking them up at about 800 a year ever since.

He took his wife, Monica, on her first jump when they were dating and she’s up to 2,000 now. The couple lives with a 4-year-old son, Logan, in Washington, where Aikins’ family owns Skydive Kapowsin near Tacoma.

Over the years Aikins has taught skydiving and taught others to teach skydiving.

He tells of having his chute tangle with others on a couple of those efforts and having to come down under his reserve parachute. In all, he’s used his reserve 30 times, not a bad number for 18,000 jumps.

“If I wasn’t nervous, I would be stupid,” the compact, muscular athlete says with a grin.

“We’re talking about jumping without a parachute, and I take that very seriously. It’s not a joke,” he adds.

Nearby, a pair of huge cranes defines the boundaries where the net in which Aikins expects to land is being erected. It will be about one-third the size of a football field and 20 stories high, providing enough space to cushion his fall without allowing him to bounce out. The target has been tested repeatedly using dummies.

One of those 200-pound dummies didn’t bounce out. It crashed right through.

“That was not a good thing to see,” recalled Jimmy Smith, a Hollywood public relations man who came up with the idea for the jump. .

“Luke just said, ‘No biggie, that’s why we test.”‘