WATERVILLE — The following Colby College events are free and open to the public.

• Museum Open House and Artist’s Lecture by Lois Dodd is set to begin at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Colby College Museum of Art.

The evening will begin with a lecture by American figurative artist Lois Dodd in conjunction with the exhibition Lois Dodd: Cultivating Vision. Musical duo Edith and Bennett will perform “Works of Songs and Art” at 7 p.m. Refreshments and museum tours will be available.

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600.

• Gerrish Lecture: “Sex and the Soul,” is set to begin at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 10, at the Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building.

Donna Freitas, author of “Sex and the Soul,” will lead a discussion of hookup culture and spirituality on college campuses.

For more information, contact Kurt Nelson at [email protected] or 859-4272.

“Noontime Art Talk: Hannah Williams Blunt” is set for noon Thursday, Sept. 11, at the Colby College Museum of Art.

Langlais Curator for Special Projects Hannah Williams Blunt will discuss the Bernard Langlais exhibition.

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600.

• Faculty Showcase will take place from 1 to 4 p.m. Friday, Sept. 12, at the Bixler Art and Music Center.

In conjunction with the inauguration of President David A. Greene on Saturday, Sept. 13, and in celebration of Colby’s rigorous academics, six Colby faculty members will speak about teaching and learning. They will have 20 minutes each to speak and take questions, with 10 minutes between each talk. Audience members may come and go between talks. The following professors are scheduled to speak: Catherine Besteman, Francis F. Bartlett and Ruth K. Bartlett Professor of Anthropology; D. Whitney King, Dr. Frank and Theodora Miselis Professor of Chemistry; Lydia Moland, Associate Professor of Philosophy; Philip Nyhus, Associate Professor of Environmental Studies; Andrea Tilden, J. Warren Merrill Associate Professor of Biology; and John Turner, Associate Professor of History. For more information on inauguration events, visit the inauguration website, email [email protected] or call 859-4786.

• Reflections on the Faculty Showcase is set for 4:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 12, at the Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Center.

A panel will reflect on the faculty showcase taking place earlier in the day. President David A. Greene will moderate. For more information on inauguration activities, visit the inauguration website, email [email protected] or call 859-4786.

• Langlais Art-Making Workshop is planned for 10 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 13, at the Colby College Museum of Art.

Adults and children are invited to create works of art inspired by Maine artist Bernard Langlais, whose paintings, works on paper, and folksy wood sculptures and reliefs are featured in a major museum exhibition now on view. This event is free, but attendance is limited and preregistration is required. To register, call 859-5613.

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600.

• The Role of Liberal Arts in Developing Future Leaders: Toward a More Engaged — and Civil Citizenry, is set to begin at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 13, at the Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building.

Panelists include David Axelrod, director of the Institute of Politics at the University of Chicago; Susan Collins, U.S. Senator from Maine; Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, professor of education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education; and Robert J. Zimmer, president of the University of Chicago. Professor of Government L. Sandy Maisel will moderate. For more information, visit the inauguration website, email [email protected] or call 859-4786.

• Inauguration of David A. Greene: Installation Ceremony, is set to begin at 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 13, at the Miller Library Lawn.

Greene will be formally installed as Colby’s 20th president. A reception will follow. In case of rain, the ceremony will be in Lorimer Chapel. For more information, visit the inauguration website, email [email protected] or call 859-4786.

• Is Conservation Prepared for Climate Change? is set to begin at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 16, in Room 1, at the Olin Science Center.

We know that climate change has profound implications on wildlife, ecosystems and ecosystem services that people rely on for their well-being, but far too often we view climate change as a slow-moving problem that can wait until the future. How much time do we really have? What will happen if we wait too long? Are universities preparing students for a different kind of future where careers in conservation and natural resource management will require new ways of thinking and problem solving? Shaun Martin, senior director of climate change adaptation for the World Wildlife Fund, will discuss.

For more information, contact Lia Morris at [email protected], 859-5356.

• Music in the Museum: Music’s Quill with Special Guest Todd Borgerdingwill begin at noon Wednesday, Sept. 17, at the Colby College Museum of Art.

Music’s Quill (Timothy Neill Johnson, tenor, and Timothy Burris, lute) will be joined by Associate Professor of Music Todd Borgerding, viola, for a program of English lute songs by John Dowland. Dowland is best known today for his melancholy songs such as “Come, Heavy Sleep” (the basis for Benjamin Britten’s Nocturnal) and “Flow My Tears.” But, as this program demonstrates, he could also express lighter musical sentiments in song.

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected], 859-5600.

• Diversity on the Israeli Street: Sesame Workshop’s Rechov Sumsum Project is set to begin at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 17, at the Pugh Center, Cotter Union.

Sesame Workshop, the nonprofit behind Sesame Street, has worked with international production teams to develop more than 30 adaptations of the acclaimed children’s program. This presentation and hands-on workshop offers participants a window into the process of creating Rechov Sumsum, the award-winning Israeli version of the series. The workshop will give participants the opportunity to design diversity-oriented program content in a training activity similar to that offered to production teams.

For more information, contact Professor David Freidenreich at [email protected] or 859-4646.

• Lecture with 2014 Oak Human Rights Fellow Clare Byarugaba, is planned for 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 17, in Room 122, at the Diamond Building.

Byarugaba of Uganda is the 2014 Oak Human Rights Fellow at Colby’s Oak Institute for the Study of International Human Rights. Byarugaba is co-coordinator of the Civil Society Coalition on Human Rights and Constitutional Law, founded in 2009 to work on behalf of the LGBTI community in Uganda and to fight efforts to criminalize homosexuality in that country. Byarugaba will speak about her human rights work and experiences.

For more information, contact Amanda Cooley at [email protected] or 859-5319.

• Student Docent Program is set to begin at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, at the Colby College Museum of Art.

The evening will include a reception in the William D. Adams Gallery and free tours led by students in Colby’s Student Docent Program every 15 minutes until 9 p.m.

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600.

• Bipartisan Panel on Civil Discourse is begin at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 18, at the Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building.

Panelists will include Ethan Strimling, executive director of Learning Works and former Democratic state senator; Rachel Talbot-Ross, president of the Portland chapter of the NAACP; Heidi Shott, canon for communications and social justice for the Episcopal Diocese of Maine; and Michael Franz, associate professor of government and legal studies at Bowdoin College. Dan Shea, director of the Goldfarb Center for Public Affairs and Civic Engagement at Colby, will moderate.

For more information, contact Amanda Cooley at [email protected] or 859-5319.

• Capitalism v. Democracy: Money in Politics and the Free Market Constitution is set to begin at noon Monday, Sept. 22, at Room 122, at the Diamond Building.

Supreme Court decisions on money in politics have marginalized ordinary citizens and allowed market forces to dominate democracy. Timothy Kuhner, associate professor of law at Georgia State University College of Law and author of Capitalism v. Democracy, will reflect on key cases, such as Citizens United and McCutcheon, and their real-world effects.

For more information, contact Amanda Cooley at [email protected] or 859-5319.

• Noontime Art Talk: Lauren Lessing is planned for noon Thursday, Sept. 25, at Colby College Museum of Art.

Mirken Curator of Education Lauren Lessing will discuss Gregory Orloff’s “At the Movie” and the international language of silent film.

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600.

• Environmental Studies Book Club Lunch: An Unspoken Hunger will begin at noon Thursday, Sept. 25, in the Fairchild Room, at Dana Dining Hall.

Award-winning author Terry Tempest Williams is Colby’s 2014-15 Andrew W. Mellon Distinguished Fellow in Environmental Studies. Have lunch and discuss her book “An Unspoken Hunger: Stories from the Field”.

For more information, contact Lia Morris at [email protected] or 859-5356.

• Visiting Writers Series: Craft Talk with Maurice Manning will begin at 4 p.m. Monday, Sept. 29, at Robinson Room, at the Miller Library.

A former Guggenheim Fellow, poet Maurice Manning has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and is a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. In 2013 he published his fifth collection of poems, “The Gone and the Going Away,” and “The Rag-Picker’s Guide to Poetry,” a collection he coedited with Eleanor Wilner. He teaches at Transylvania University and in the M.F.A. Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.

For more information, contact Professor Debra Spark at [email protected] or 859-5284.

• Visiting Writers Series: Poetry Reading with Maurice Manning is set for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 30, in Robinson Room, Miller Library.

A former Guggenheim Fellow, poet Manning has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and is a member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. In 2013 he published his fifth collection of poems, “The Gone and the Going Away,” and “The Rag-Picker’s Guide to Poetry,” a collection he coedited with Eleanor Wilner. He teaches at Transylvania University and in the M.F.A. Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College. A book signing and reception will follow the reading.

For more information, contact Professor Debra Spark at [email protected] or 859-5284.

• Modern and Ancient Anti-Semitism Reconsidered is planned for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 30, in Room 213, Lovejoy Building.

What is anti-Semitism, and how long has it been with us? Given that the term was coined in the late 19th century, can we find validity in its application to similar phenomena in earlier periods? Avi Avidov, a lecturer at Israel’s Beit Berl College and author of Not Reckoned Among Nations: The Origins of the So-Called Jewish Question in Roman Antiquity, will explain the emergence and persistence of anti-Semitism by focusing on structural similarities of the Jews’ position within the larger sociopolitical entities into which they repeatedly failed to integrate fully.

For more information, contact Professor David Freidenreich at [email protected] or 859-4646.

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