WATERVILLE — The following events at Colby College are free unless otherwise noted and open to the public.

• Cotter Debate Series: Hydraulic Fracking — Economic Boom or Natural Disaster? wil be the topic at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 6, in Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building.

Fracking, an unconventional method of extracting oil and gas, has generated controversy in recent years. Proponents see it as an economic boon that will generate jobs and improve energy security, while detractors point out the environmental risks. This debate will feature three experts discussing the geological background and engineering advancements that make fracking possible, economic impacts, environmental concerns, and potential implications for the renewable energy industry. Panelists include Tim Carr, Marshall Miller Professor of Geology, West Virginia University; Jessica Helm, director, Sierra Club Board of Directors, and postdoctoral fellow, Silent Spring Institute; and Erin Mansur ’95, Revers Professor of Business Administration, Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College. Sahan T. M. Dissanayake, assistant professor of economics and associate director of the Goldfarb Center at Colby, will moderate.

For more information, contact Alison Gagliardi at [email protected] or 859-5319.

• Screening: Art in the Twenty-First Century is set for 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 6, and Thursday, Nov. 13, at Mirken Education Center, Colby College Museum of Art.

Produced by and screened in collaboration with Art21, Art in the Twenty-First Century is a Peabody Award-winning series in its seventh season on PBS. Art21 is a nonprofit dedicated to making contemporary art more accessible.

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600

• Music at Colby: Outsourcing — It’s Not Plagiarism, It’s a Compliment! will begin at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 8, in Iven Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Center.

The Colby Jazz Band, with Eric Thomas conducting, will feature jazz standards borrowed from musicals, operas, movies, and even cartoons. Songs will include “Summertime,” “My Favorite Things,” “My Funny Valentine,” “As Time Goes By,” “Body and Soul,” “All the Things You Are,” “I Got Rhythm,” and “Some Day My Prince Will Come.”

For more information, contact Deb Ward at [email protected] or 859-5670.

• Visiting Artist Lecture Series: Aaron T Stephan is set for 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 10, in Room 1, Olin Science Center.

Portland artist Aaron T. Stephan will present his creative folio with an image-based lecture. Stephan has been featured in numerous group and solo exhibitions, including at Quint Contemporary Art, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum, Center for Maine Contemporary Art, and the Portland Museum of Art.

For more information, contact Vicki Crommett at [email protected] or 859-5631.

• Visiting Writers Series: Craft Talk and Fiction Reading with Andrew Altschul will begin at 6 p.m. Monday, Nov. 10, in the Robinson Room, Miller Library.

Altschul is the author of the novels “Deus Ex Machina” and “Lady Lazarus”. His stories and essays have appeared in The O. Henry Prize Stories, Best American Nonrequired Reading, Best New American Voices, and publications including Esquire, Ploughshares, McSweeney’s, and One Story. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow and Jones Lecturer at Stanford University, he was the founding books editor of The Rumpus and is currently a contributing editor at Zyzzyva and director of the Center for Literary Arts at San Jose State University.

For more information, contact Professor Catherine Besteman at [email protected] or 859-4702.

• Visiting Writers Series: Poetry Reading with Evie Shockley is set for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 11, in the Robinson Room, Miller Library.

Shockley is the author of two books of poetry — the new black, winner of the 2012 Hurston/Wright Legacy Award in Poetry, and a half-red sea — as well as the critical study Renegade Poetics: Black Aesthetics and Formal Innovation in African American Poetry. Shockley’s honors include the 2012 Holmes National Poetry Prize and fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. Currently serving as creative writing editor for Feminist Studies, she is associate professor of English at Rutgers University. A book signing and reception will follow the reading.

For more information, contact Professor Debra Spark at [email protected] or 859-5284.

• Ecosystem and Fishery Impacts from the Rapid Warming of the Gulf of Maine will be the topic at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 11, in Room 1, Olin Science Center.

Over the last 10 years, the Gulf of Maine has warmed faster than 99 percent of the global ocean. This rapid warming presents an opportunity to understand how marine ecosystems and the fisheries that depend on them respond to rising temperatures. The recent warming is linked to changes in weather patterns over the Northeast that may be related to temperatures in the Pacific and to warming in the Arctic. The warming in the Gulf of Maine has impacted a range of commercially important species, leading to higher catches of lobster but likely playing a role in the collapse of the fisheries for cod and northern shrimp. Andrew Pershing, chief scientific officer at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute, will discuss.

For more information, contact Lia Morris at [email protected] or 859-5356.

• That Dam Lake: Land and Lake Conservation in Midcoast Maine will be discussed at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, Nov. 12, in the Fairchild Room, Dana Dining Hall.

Garrison Beck ’13 of the Damariscotta Lake Watershed Association (DLWA) will discuss land and lake conservation. DLWA is a nonprofit in midcoast Maine that has the challenge of controlling hydrilla, considered the worst invasive aquatic plant in North America. In conjunction with its work on water quality, conservation easements, nonpoint source pollution, and education, DLWA aims to protect and conserve the 56 square miles of the Damariscotta Lake watershed.

For more information, contact Lia Morris at [email protected] or 859-5356.

• Noontime Art Talk: Laura Saltz is set for noon Wednesday, Nov. 12, at Colby College Museum of Art.

Associate Professor of American Studies Laura Saltz will give a talk titled “Ethical Photography: Lewis Hine’s Immigrants.”

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600.

• Science, Technology and Society Talk: Lynda Walsh is planned for 4 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 13, in Room 215, Lovejoy Building.

Lynda Walsh, professor of English at University of Nevada, Reno, will lecture about the visual composition processes of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) researchers and the implications for civic scientific literacy.

For more information, contact Professor Jim Fleming at [email protected] or 859-5881.

• Tim Rollins and K.O.S. will be featured at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 13, in Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Center.

New York-based artist and educator Tim Rollins and K.O.S. (Kids of Survival) develop work out of critical engagement with texts. One such example is the Colby Museum of Art’s Darkwater (after W. E. B. Du Bois), 2013, recently acquired in honor of Colby President Emeritus William D. Adams.

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600.

• Orlando will begin at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 15, at Strider Theater, Runnals Building.

A man named Orlando lives life to the fullest through three centuries and, after a long sleep, becomes a woman. A romp through the ages and a meditation on time, gender, and sexuality, Virginia Woolf’s Orlando is often called the longest love letter in literary history. This adaptation by award-winning playwright Sarah Ruhl uses narrative and a chorus to enact lyrical, instant, and whimsical transformations, throwing gender, temporality, and geography into a world where fluidity reigns over fixity.

For more information, contact Shannon Hodgdon at [email protected] or 859-4520.

• Museum Community Day: Migrations will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 15, at Colby College Museum of Art.

In conjunction with the Colby College Center for the Arts and Humanities’ annual theme, Migrations, this family-friendly event will include art making, tours, gallery games, and snacks. All ages welcome.

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600.

• Music at Colby: Migrations — Coming To America will be staged at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 15, at the Waterville Opera House.

The Colby Wind Ensemble and Colby Chorale will perform works by American composers for winds and chorus. The repertoire will include “Jubilate Deo” from Tres Cantus Laudendi by Mack Wilberg, “In Remembrance” by Jeffery Ames, “Sleep” by Eric Whitacre, and “America the Beautiful” by Samuel Ward.

For more information, contact Deb Ward at [email protected] or 859-5670.

• Pilgrimage in a Tourist Age: The Case of Birthright Israel will be the topic at 5 p.m. Monday, Nov. 17, in the Parker-Reed Room, Schair-Swenson-Watson Alumni Center.

Since 1999 hundreds of thousands of young American Jews have visited Israel on an all-expenses-paid 10-day pilgrimage tour known as Birthright Israel. The most elaborate of the state-supported homeland tours, this half-billion-dollar venture seeks to deepen the ties binding the Jewish diaspora to Israel. But unlike Jewish pilgrimages of millennia past, Birthright Israel adopts and adapts the practices of modern mass tourism. What happens when a state looks to tourism to create a new pilgrimage ritual for the 21st century? Shaul Kelner, associate professor of sociology and Jewish studies at Vanderbilt University and director of Vanderbilt’s Program in Jewish Studies, will discuss. All are welcome to the lecture and to the dinner and discussion that will follow; RSVP to Professor David Freidenreich at [email protected] by Nov. 12.

For more information, contact Professor David Freidenreich at [email protected] or 859-4646.

• Monday Night Movies: “Sunrise” will begin at 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 17, at the Waterville Opera House.

One of the last films of the silent era, Sunrise is often recognized as one of the great films in the history of cinema. Dreamlike and visually astonishing, this fable tells the story of a country farmer who, seduced by a sophisticated city woman, plots the murder of his wife. Sunrise won an Academy Award for Unique and Artistic Production at the first Academy Awards ceremony, in 1929. Cost is $9 for the general public. A full pass (admits one to all screenings in the Monday Night Movies series) may be purchased for $50. For additional movies, see the Center for the Arts and Humanities website.

For more information, contact Megan Fossa at [email protected] or 859-4165.

• Trophic Interactions in a Changing Climate: Linking Mechanisms with Outcomes in Fresh Waters will begin at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 18, in Room 1, Olin Science Center.

Hamish Greig, assistant professor of stream ecology at the University of Maine, is currently researching community ecology of aquatic ecosystems.

For more information, contact Lia Morris at [email protected] or 859-5356.

• Transgender November Keynote Address: Mara Keisling will begin at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 18, in Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building.

Mara Keisling, founding executive director of the National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE), is one of the nation’s leading transgender rights activists. Keisling’s work at NCTE has resulted in numerous victories for the transgender equality movement, including new policies on updating gender on passports and Social Security records, access to transition-related health care, and nondiscrimination in employment, housing, and schools. She has appeared on news outlets such as CNN and C-SPAN and is regularly quoted in hundreds of media including the New York Times and Washington Post. For more Transgender November events and the latest updates, see Colby’s Transgender November Facebook page.

For more information, contact Andy Kang ’15 at [email protected]

• Evening of Ekphrasis is set for 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 20, at Colby College Museum of Art

Faculty and students in Colby’s Creative Writing Program will read poetry written in response to works on view in the museum galleries.

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600.

• Music at Colby: Colby Collegium Fall Concert — Bach will begin at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 20, at Lorimer Chapel.

Directed by Todd Borgerding, the Colby Chamber Singers and Players will present vocal and instrumental music by J.S. Bach, including two cantatas: Nun Komm der Heiden Heiland (BWV 61) and Actus Tragicus (BWV 106), whose uplifting music belies its gloomy name. Look for instrumental chamber music as well in an exciting program where the best of the High Baroque meets the best of Colby student performers.

For more information, contact Deb Ward at [email protected] or 859-5670.

• Science, Technology and Society Talk: Joseph Martin will begin at 4 p.m. Friday, Nov. 21, in Room 215, Lovejoy Building.

Joseph Martin of Michigan State University will give a lecture titled “Scientists Are Worse than Other Professors,” exploring science and morality at Robert Maynard Hutchins’s University of Chicago. Hutchins was president of the university from 1929 to 1945 and chancellor from 1945 to 1951.

For more information, contact Professor Jim Fleming at [email protected] or 859-5881.

• Music at Colby: Musical Migrations is set for 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 22, at Lorimer Chapel.

With Stan Renard conducting, the Colby Symphony Orchestra will present a performance focusing on musical migrations. The concert will open with the overture and entr’acte to Bizet’s Carmen, with its strong Spanish dance influences. Alexander Borodin’s Polovtsian Dance no. 17, intended to evince the exoticism of the Middle East, will follow. Also included will be Antonin Dvorak’s well-known Czech Suite, op. 39.

For more information, contact Deb Ward at [email protected] or 859-5670.

• Fall Dance Concert will begin at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 23, at Strider Theater, Runnals Building.

Featuring original work by student choreographers and lighting designers, this concert showcases the role of creative research at Colby. As a professional adjudicator at a recent national conference said about one of Colby’s student choreographers, “We come to dance because it is a powerful way to understand how we can experience something with others, and this choreographer is onto that. In this piece, there is a sense of trying to channel something larger than ourselves.” Experience the ways in which these choreographers and lighting designers are indeed channeling something larger.

For more information, contact Shannon Hodgdon at [email protected] or 859-4520.


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