WATERVILLE — Colby College has planned the following March events. Events are free unless otherwise noted.

• Grossman Lecture: Poverty, Inequality and the Social Safety Net in the United States will begin at 7 p.m. Monday, March 2, at Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building.

Hilary Hoynes ’83 holds the Haas Distinguished Chair in Economic Disparities and is professor of public policy and economics at the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. She specializes in the study of poverty, inequality and the impacts of government tax and transfer programs on low-income families.

For more information, contact Dianne Labreck, at [email protected], or 859-5230.

• The Photographic Self-Portraits of Martín Chambi will be the topic at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 3, at the Colby College Museum of Art.

Celia Rubina Vargas, professor of semiotics at the Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú, will give a lecture on Martín Chambi (1891-1973). A Latin American photographer from a peasant family in the highlands of Peru, Chambi developed his photographic art in the city of Cuzco. His photography reveals the shifting nature of artistic identity in a Latin American context.

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600.

• Environmental Studies Program Evening Lecture Series: Our Future with Bees will begin at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 3, in Room 1, Olin Science Center.

According to Noah Wilson-Rich, founder of the Best Bees Company, bees can create economic and ecological sustainability, but they are dying off. What does the future human condition look like in a world that incorporates bees into our architecture, health care, and everyday lives? Wilson-Rich will discuss.

For more information, contact Lia Morris at [email protected] or 859-5356.

• Leaning in from the White House: Promoting Global Women’s and LGBT Human Rights is set for 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 3, in Room 122, Diamond Building.

Jamille Bigio, former White House director for human rights and gender, will reflect on her work to promote equal rights and opportunities for women and LGBT people. She will discuss what it took to push out new policies, from investing in women as part of a strategy to end conflict and build lasting peace, to hosting the first White House forum on global LGBT human rights with leaders from the private sector and the faith and human rights communities. She will also reflect on how the United States’ domestic experiences with these issues affect its global engagement.

For more information, contact Amanda Cooley, [email protected], or 859-5319.

• Environmental Studies Program Lunchtime Lecture Series: Hemlock Woolly Adelgid and Maine Forests will take place at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, March 4, in the Fairchild Room, Dana Dining Hall.

Allison Kanoti, an entomologist with the Maine Forest Service, will discuss the impact of the hemlock woolly adelgid, an invasive insect that attacks hemlock trees, on Maine forests. Hemlocks are most prevalent around bodies of water, helping protect forests from erosion and maintaining liveable water temperatures for fish such as brook trout. In May 2014 the Maine Department of Agriculture released more than 10,000 predator beetles in several HWA-infested areas in southern Maine, the beginnings of an effort to combat the invasive bug.

For more information, contact Lia Morris at [email protected] or 859-5356.

• Noontime Art Talk: Véronique Plesch will begin at noon Wednesday, March 4, at Colby College Museum of Art.

Professor of Art History Véronique Plesch will discuss the practice of the grand tour in the 19th century and the souvenirs brought back, mostly from Italy.

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600.

• Moses in Babylon? Struggles for Power in the Middle East (or Why Reading the Bible Matters, Even if You Aren’t Religious) is planned for 4 p.m. Wednesday, March 4, in Room 215, Lovejoy Building.

What do Bob Marley, Nebuchadnezzar II, and the ancient Israelites of the Hebrew Bible have in common? In the third millennium BCE, Sargon of Akkad created the world’s first empire and located his capital city on the Euphrates in what is now Iraq. Since his time, Babylonia has been a magnet for warriors, prophets, poets, and priests in search of conquest or meaning. Alison Acker Gruseke, a Ph.D. candidate in religious studies at Yale, will focus on a particular remnant of those journeys: a cuneiform tablet inscribed with the legend of Sargon’s birth, its links to the story of the infant Moses in his basket on the Nile, and the ways in which geography, religion, and history contribute to the making of meaning in texts from the past and present.

For more information, contact Professor David Freidenreich at [email protected] or 859-4646.

• The film “The Man from Oran,” will screened at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 4, at Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building.

The Man from Oran depicts the betrayal of revolutionary ideals by Algeria’s political leaders after the country gained independence from France in 1962. Djaffar — the man from Oran — has no interest in the liberation movement but finds himself involved with his friend Hamid in the murder of a French farmer. They get away, but, unknown to Djaffar until after the war, his wife is raped by the farmer’s vengeful son and gives birth to a boy before dying in despair. When Djaafar returns home to a hero’s welcome, he accepts his son but asks everyone to act as if the rape never occurred. Hamid, now a minister in the new government, helps him rewrite the past. But year after year the two friends grow apart, and their deliberate falsification of history has terrible consequences for them, for their friends and families, and for the country.

For more information, contact Megan Fossa at [email protected] or 859-4165.

• Queering the Nation from the Other Side: Juan Gabriel, Performance, and the Margins of Mexicanidad will be the topic at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 5, in Given Auditorium, Bixler Art and Music Center.

Alberto Aguilera Valadez, known as Juan Gabriel, is one of the most prolific and successful Mexican songwriters and performers of the last 40 years and an icon of contemporary Mexican popular culture. His effeminate public persona has prompted fans and critics alike to question his masculinity. Alejandro Madrid, professor of musicology at Cornell, will discuss the films Al otro lado del puente and El Noa Noa, the songs “La frontera” and “Canción 187,” and the album El México que se nos fue in relation to the notion of “the other side” — which Mexicans and Mexican-Americans use both when speaking of the land on “the other side” of the Rio Grande and as a synonym for homosexuality. Madrid will explore the relationship between the geographic borders of the nation-state and the imagined borders of Mexican masculinity.

For more information, contact Megan Fossa at [email protected] or 859-4165.

• Spring Dance Concert is set for 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 6-Saturday, March 7, at Strider Theater, Runnals Building.

This performance will feature Assistant Professor Annie Kloppenberg’s professional company in the premiere of Entrances and Echoes and a thesis project by Sara Gibbons ’15, Into the Frame of Us. Heralded by the Boston Globe as “a choreographer of nuances,” Kloppenberg presents a thematic doubling in Entrances and Echoes, playing with anonymity, togetherness, and the spaces between. The cast comprises celebrated professional dancers from Boston, Washington, D.C., and New York City. Gibbons’s Into the Frame of Us explores the oversaturation and repurposing of disparate, simultaneous, and idiosyncratic events. Tickets are free and may be reserved through the Department of Theater and Dance website or by calling 207-859-4520.

For more information, contact Shannon Hodgdon at [email protected] or 859-4520.

• “National Gallery” will be screened at 6 p.m. Monday, March 9, at Railroad Square Cinema.

Frederick Wiseman’s documentary goes inside one of the world’s great museums: the “National Gallery” in London. The film is the portrait of a place, its way of working, its relations with the world, its staff and visiting public, and its paintings. In a perpetual, dizzying game of mirrors, film watches painting watches film. Associate Professor of Cinema Studies Steve Wurtzler will provide introductory remarks.

For more information, contact Megan Fossa at [email protected] or 859-4165.

• Concussions in Sports: Creating Evidence-Based Concussion Management Policies will be the focus at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 10, Room 122, Diamond Building.

In recent years concussions have garnered significant public attention and state and sports-league policy responses. Christine Baugh, a health policy Ph.D. candidate at Harvard, will discuss existing evidence about concussions, their acute and long-term effects, and concussion management policies in place at the state and sports-league levels.

For more information, contact Amanda Cooley, [email protected], or 859-5319.

• Environmental Studies Program Lunchtime Lecture Series: Building a Life and Farming Business in Maine will begin at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, March 11, in the Fairchild Room, Dana Dining Hall.

Since 2001 Prentice Grassi ’95 and his wife, Polly Shyka, have been farming their own land and growing food for themselves and their three kids in Freedom. Their goal is for their farm to make important contributions to the community and the local economy while furthering the future of agriculture. Grassi imagines Village Farm as a community resource — a place where neighbors can connect with each other and with the source of their food.

For more information, contact Lia Morris at [email protected] or 859-5356.

• “The Red Address” will be staged at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 13, through Saturday, March 14, in the Paul J. Schupf Wing for the Works of Alex Katz, Colby College Museum of Art.

Colby’s student-run theatrical group, Powder and Wig, will stage “The Red Address” by David Ives. In this searing drama, businessman E.G. Triplett’s business, sanity, and life come under siege when a mysterious rival threatens to take over his company — and reveal his secret. Before the performance, visitors are invited to view an accompanying installation of artworks that relate to the play in the museum’s Landay Teaching Gallery. Parental discretion is advised.

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600.

• Music at Colby: Concerto Mania! will begin at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, March 14, in Lorimer Chapel.

The Colby Symphony Orchestra will feature Professor Yuri Lily Funahashi performing Beethoven’s “Fourth Piano Concerto.” The program will also include CSO’s French horn section in a performance of Schumann’s Konzertstück for Four Horns and Orchestra and the shimmering symphonic poem The Moldau by Bedrich Smetana.

For more information, contact Deb Ward at [email protected] or 859-5670.

• “Zero Motivation” will be screened at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, March 15, at Railroad Square Cinema.

Female Israeli soldiers at a remote desert base bide their time as they count down the minutes until they can return to civilian life. Rabbi Rachel Isaacs will lead a post-screening discussion. This screening is part of the Maine Jewish Film Festival. Tickets cost $9 per screening for the general public and $7 for students and for adults older 65. Visit mjff.org/tickets for ticket information.

For more information, contact Professor David Freidenreich at [email protected] or 859-4646.

• “Monday Night Movies: “Walkabout” will be screened at 7 p.m. Monday, March 16, at the Waterville Opera House, 1 Common St.

Two city-bred siblings are stranded in the Australian Outback and survive due to a chance meeting with an Aborigine boy on a walkabout — a ritual separation from his tribe. Walkabout isn’t about struggle for survival in the scorching desert, nor is it simply about the clash of two cultures. It intimates, according to Roger Ebert, that we are all “captives of environment and programming: that there is a wide range of experiment and experience that remains forever invisible to us, because it falls in a spectrum we simply cannot see.” Cost is $9 for the general public and $5 for Colby students.

For more information, contact Megan Fossa at [email protected] or 859-4165.

• Justice for Women will be the topic at 7 p.m. Monday, March 16, in Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building.

Ruchira Gupta is founder and president of Apne Aap Women Worldwide, a grassroots organization in India working to end sex trafficking by increasing choices for at-risk girls and women. Over her 25-year career, Gupta has tried to highlight the link between trafficking and prostitution laws and to lobby policymakers to shift blame from victims to perpetrators. Prior to founding Apne Aap, Gupta worked in the United Nations for more than 10 years. She is a board member of the Coalition Against Trafficking in Women, among other anti-trafficking organizations. For more information on Gupta, visit justiceforwomenme.org/speakers.

For more information, contact Beth Christopher at [email protected], or 859-5300.

• Noontime Art Talk: Jonathan Hallstrom is set for noon Tuesday, March 17, at the Colby College Museum of Art.

Associate Professor of Music Jonathan Hallstrom will give a talk “The Color of Sound and the Sound of Color: A Musician’s View of Aural-Visual Synergies.”

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600.

• Environmental Studies Program Evening Lecture Series: Are GMOs Safe? What the Science Tells Us will begin at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 17, in Room 1, Olin Science Center.

Some prominent scientists and policymakers assert that there is no scientific controversy over the health effects of GMOs — that these genetically modified crops are inherently safe and do not have to be tested. According to Sheldon Krimsky, professor of urban and environmental policy and planning at Tufts, the scientific evidence reveals a different story. Krimsky will discuss his views on how politics and corporate interests have distorted an honest look at the health and environmental effects of GMO crops.

For more information, contact Lia Morris at [email protected] or 859-5356.

• German Spring Film Series: (Almost) Classic German Cinema, will be the focus at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 17, in Room 450, Lovejoy Building.

In the Golden Globe-nominated “Good Bye, Lenin!” a young man tries to protect his mother from fatal shock post-coma by hiding the truth — that her beloved East Germany is no longer.

For more information, contact Vivian Wood at [email protected] or 859-4400.

• Is Satire Saving Our Nation? Mockery and American Politics will be the topic at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 18, at Ostrove Auditorium, Diamond Building.

Do you watch satire on TV? Have you re-posted a hilarious yet biting graphic on Facebook or tweeted jabs at politicians? Does it sometimes seem to you that Jon Stewart is a better journalist than most of CNN, Fox, and MSNBC? Were you a bit disappointed when Stephen Colbert did not actually run for president? Sophia McClennen, professor of international affairs and comparative literature at Penn State University, will survey the broad landscape of satire today and situate it in our nation’s history.

For more information, contact Amanda Cooley, [email protected], or 859-5319.

• Noontime Art Talk: Mark Melnicove will begin at noon Tuesday, March 31, at Colby College Museum of Art.

Mark Melnicove was the longtime publisher and performance art partner of artist Bern Porter ’32, and he directed “Joy Glows Where Confusion Ends: A Film About, With, and Without Bern Porter.” Melnicove will examine Porter’s methodology for creating found art and poetry and consider issues raised by the founds, including the nature of originality and authorship, the appropriateness (legal, moral, etc.) of appropriative art and writing, and the cultural and political implications of Porter’s steadfast refusal to keep within the bounds of aesthetic propriety.

For more information, contact Colby College Museum of Art at [email protected] or 859-5600.

• Environmental Studies Program Evening Lecture Series: Can We Save the Environment — from Space? is set for 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 31, in Room 1, Olin Science Center.

Orbiting satellites are collecting an ever-increasing stream of observations of our planet: taking its picture, monitoring its processes, and measuring its health. SkyTruth is an organization that uses these observations to examine the environmental consequences of human activities. John Amos, president of SkyTruth, will explore the impacts of mining, fracking, commercial fishing, and other activities that are altering the Earth’s landscapes, habitats and ecosystems.

For more information, contact Lia Morris at [email protected] or 859-5356.

• Nuova Terra Promessa: Italian Jews in the New Promised Land will be the topic at 7 p.m., Tuesday, March 31, in Room 215, Lovejoy Building.

After Mussolini’s government passed laws severely limiting the rights of the Jewish minority in Italy, in 1938, a small group of Italian Jews made their way to the United States, where they had to re-establish themselves. When she came to the United States in the 1970s, Italian journalist Gianna Pontecorboli began to look into this group of immigrants and interview all the survivors she could find. Pontecorboli will discuss her research, show video clips of interviews, and present the conclusions of her book, America: Nuova Terra Promessa. A Q&A session will follow.

For more information, Contact: Professor David Freidenreich at [email protected] or 859-4646.


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