NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A bill allowing staff and faculty at Tennessee’s public colleges and universities to be armed on campus became law Monday without the Republican governor’s signature.

Gov. Bill Haslam said in a statement that he disagreed with the bill for not allowing institutions “to make their own decisions regarding security issues on campus.”

But the governor acknowledged that the final version of the measure had addressed concerns raised by college administrators during the legislative process by including provisions protecting schools from liability and a requirement to notify law enforcement about who is armed on campus.

“Ultimately, this legislation was tailored to apply to certain employees in specific situations,” Haslam said.

The law, which allows faculty and staff with state-issued handgun carry permits to carry, is more limited than a bill that Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal must decide on by Tuesday. That measure would allow anyone age 21 and up to carry a concealed handgun on campus with the proper permit.

The Tennessee law, which takes effect on July 1, will keep gun bans in place for stadiums or gymnasiums while school-sponsored events are in progress; meetings where disciplinary or tenure issues are being discussed; hospitals or offices where medical or mental health services are provided; and any location prohibited by another law, such as at day care centers or elementary schools located on campus.

University of Tennessee President Joe DiPietro said in a statement that he opposes more guns on campus.