The ice snapped trees and power lines, leaving many Mainers in the dark for a long, long time. A total of 600,000 Mainers were without power at some point during the storm and damages across the state topped out at $320 million.

If you’ve forgotten what January 1998 was like (or you weren’t in Maine at the time), you can feel the chill again with these stories published from Jan. 9-17:

 

Storm cuts power to 220,000 customers in Maine

Published Jan. 9, 1998
Hundreds of people head for shelters after a ‘dangerous’ ice storm coats roads and downs tree branches and power lines. A state of emergency is called, and more icy rain is predicted.
Read the story.

 

Storm keeps icy hold on Maine for 2nd day

Published Jan. 10, 1998
Hundreds of thousands of people remain without power, as crews try to keep up with power lines felled by the coat of ice.
Read the story.

 

Response to icy crisis leaves 2 people dead

Published Jan. 11, 1998
Indoor use of outdoor equipment, prompted by power outages, is causing cases of carbon monoxide poisoning.
Read the 10-day series.

 

Bitter cold in wake of ice storm brings ‘maximum danger’

Published Jan. 12, 1998
Almost half of Maine’s residents still have no power, and utility crews are finding that restoring lines is slow work.
Read the story.

 

Storm closings put schools in a bind

Published Jan. 14, 1998
The state’s educators grapple with how the crisis will affect youngsters’ educations.
Read the story.

 

President Clinton declares Maine a disaster area

Published Jan. 14, 1998
Fifteen of the state’s 16 counties become eligible for federal aid, as a new storm slows crews trying to restore power.
Read the story.

 

In darkest Maine, mind games grip the distressed

Published Jan. 17, 1998
Dig very deep, and you might find the lighter side of a long, long power outage.
Read the story.

 

 

 

 

 

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