WASHINGTON — The president isn’t the only Trump with potential conflicts of interest in the White House.

Donald Trump’s daughter Ivanka – a senior White House adviser with such duties as lobbying the Senate on tax policy and representing her father at a Group of 20 summit of world leaders – will collect more than $1 million a year from the family business that has continued to develop luxury resorts around the world during the Trump presidency.

Some of those Trump-branded developments are hiring state-owned companies for construction, receiving gifts from foreign governments in the form of public land or eased regulations and accepting payments from customers who are foreign officials.

Ivanka Trump’s continued relationship with the businesses affiliated with the Trump Organization creates potential conflicts of interest prohibited by federal law and federal ethics standards as she works as a special assistant to the president. And just like her father, she is being accused of violating the emoluments clause of the U.S. Constitution, which forbids government officials — not just presidents — from accepting gifts from foreign governments without the approval of Congress.

“To the extent she’s still taking money and she’s still in the West Wing, she has many of the same issues,” said Stephen Spaulding, chief of strategy at Common Cause, a nonpartisan group that has examined Donald Trump’s conflicts of interest.

And her troubles go beyond criticism that she is profiting from her father’s presidency. Trump, who just returned from a trip representing the United States in South Korea, faces serious questions as a result of her decision to be involved in both the family business and the White House: Is a foreign government gaining access to her through the business? Are business deals a factor in U.S. foreign policy?

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