Jim Parmentier Submitted photo

Members of the Maine’s First Ship group have spent more than 20 years researching the first ocean-going vessel built by Europeans in North America.

Last summer plans became reality when, after years in construction, a replica of the Virginia of Sagadahoc was launched in Bath, according to a news release from Bob McIntire, Row House secretary.

Jim Parmentier, who has spent a decade volunteering with the project, plans to detail the story of the Virginia and the Popham colonists in a program at 6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 19, at the Hallowell City Hall, 1 Winthrop St. This is the first presentation of the New Year by Row House, Hallowell’s historical society.

Maine’s First Ship aims to use the reconstruction of the 1607 pinnace to introduce to the public Maine’s early nautical history and craftsmanship, and to describe the relationships of the Popham colonists to the indigenous people of the land.

Maine’s First Ship aims to use the reconstruction of the 1607 pinnace Virginia to introduce to the public Maine’s early nautical history and craftsmanship, and to describe the relationships of the Popham colonists to the indigenous people of the land. Submitted photo

The presentation will describe the role of the Popham colonists within the broader context of English colonization of North America at the start of the 17th century and explore the archeological evidence establishing the Popham colonists’ efforts. Some of the colonists’ first visits to the Hallowell area were made in hopes of trading with the local residents.

Larry Davis, president of Row House, will reveal the results of those encounters from the European’s perspective.

For more information, contact McIntire at 207-592-4718 or [email protected].

 

 

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