PORTLAND PRESS HERALD DARKROOM
Wildlife Rehab 0819

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    Artemis, a Northern saw-whet owl, hangs out in her enclosure at the Center for Wildlife in Cape Neddick on Aug. 16. Artemis is one of the center's newest ambassadors. She suffered a wing injury that left her with feathers that never grew back. She doesn't have silent flight as a result of the injury and it would prevent her from being able to hunt or hide from predators effectively. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Henry the porcupine eats his lunch at the Center for Wildlife in Cape Neddick . Henry arrived at the center in 2014 after being picked up by humans as a baby who thought he was abandoned. With no fear of human or other predators, Henry was unable to be released into the wild again. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Ophelia the opossum is given a mouse for lunch by Sarah Kern at the Center for Wildlife in Cape Neddick. Ophelia came to the center in 2018 from the Squam Lake Science Center. She was raised by humans and now cannot be released into the wild. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Amber Litterer, a clinic volunteer coordinator at the Center for Wildlife, walks around the office with a corn snake relaxing on her back. The center has recently taken in dozens of orphaned baby mammals, adding to an already busy summer at the nonprofit organization. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Kristen Lamb. executive director at the Center for Wildlife, peeks into a porcupine's cage. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Kim Andre, a medical clinic apprentice at the Center for Wildlife, feeds a house finch and an American goldfinch. The house finch was brought to the center after its nest fell and its siblings died. The gold finch was found in the road. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Libby Peck, a wildlife specialist at the Center for Wildlife, puts a squirrel under anesthesia to clean out some open wounds. The squirrel was brought to the center earlier in the week after being found in the road, presumably hit by a car. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Libby Peck moves a squirrel under anesthesia back into its container after cleaning out some open wounds. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Dante the crow eats his lunch at the Center for Wildlife. Dante came to the center after a person who was raising him surrendered him. After being raised by a human for his first month of life, he would not belong, and possible not survive, with his fellow crows out in the wild. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Sarah Kern, who oversees education and outreach at the Center for Wildlife, plays with Violet the turkey vulture. Violet came to the center in 2016 from the Cape Wildlife Center in Massachusetts. She is unable to fly because of a fracture that most likely came from being hit by a car. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Sarah Kern carries food to the center's ambassadors. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Food for some of the Center for Wildlife's ambassadors is assembled by Sarah Kern in the facility's kitchen. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Kristen Lamb peaks in to a porcupine's cage at the Center for Wildlife on Thursday, August 16, 2018. Last week the center took in more than 40 orphaned baby mammals, adding to an already busy summer at the nonprofit organization. The center has seen an increase this year in the number of animals brought in. (Staff photo by Brianna Soukup/Staff Photographer)

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    Libby Peck helps move baby opossums to cages after feeding them. The baby opossums were brought in on Aug. 2. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Sarah Kern walks toward the office with Freyja. Freyja is a Peregrine Falcon that came to the center in 2004 after being hit by a car, which left her with injuries that made her unable to fly. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Freyja sits in her corner of the office at the Center for Wildlife. She is referred to by the staff as the center's "office manager." Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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    Kim Andre moves a red-shouldered hawk from its cage inside to a larger cage outside. Staff photo by Brianna Soukup

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