Voters in more than a dozen local cities and towns went to the polls Tuesday to choose party nominees for local legislative seats.

Locally, voters in four districts weighed in on Republican and Democratic primaries.

The winners will go on to compete in the November general election, when 186 House and Senate seats will be decided by voters. Republicans are looking to regain control of one or both chambers, having lost the House and Senate to Democrats in 2012.

Below are the results available by deadline on Tuesday. Check centralmaine.com for a complete list of updated results throughout the day.

HOUSE DISTRICT 85

(Most of Augusta east of the Kennebec River)

Donna Doore, 61, defeated fellow Democrat Rebecca Cornell du Houx, 28, in a primary for the right to face former Rep. Kim Davis, a Republican, in November.

Doore received 338 votes, while Cornell du Houx got 249, according to unofficial election night results.

Doore, who served on the Augusta City Council and the Augusta Board of Education, said her city government experience gives her a foundation of knowledge needed for the seat. Cornell du Houx is a Maine National Guard member serving with the Guard’s medical detachment in Augusta, and has previously worked as a social worker and mental health case manager.

HOUSE DISTRICT 82

(Litchfield, Wales, part of Monmouth)

Republican Randall Greenwood, 41, defeated Tim McDonald, 59, for the GOP nomination.

Greenwood got 335 votes and McDonald 250.

Greenwood will face Democrat Rachel Sukeforth of Litchfield in the November general election.

In Wales, Greenwood got 91 votes to McDonald’s 11. In Monmouth, Greenwood got 116 votes and McDonald 174.

Litchfield reported 128 for Greenwood and 65 for McDonald.

Greenwood, of Wales, is a manager at a payroll company, and served a number of years on the Wales board of selectmen and has been chairman of the Androscoggin County Commissioners since January 2009.

McDonald, of Monmouth, is a master electrician, who for the past 15 years has owned TMac Computers. He’s been a Monmouth selectman for the past seven years.

HOUSE DISTRICT 83

(Farmingdale and Gardiner)

Republican Curtis Ayotte, 34, of Farmingdale, defeated Scott Williams, 21, of Gardiner, in House District 83. Ayotte got 229 votes and Williams 131.

In Farmingdale, Ayotte got 122 votes and Williams got eight and in Gardiner, Ayotte got 107 votes, while Williams got 123.

Ayotte is chairman of the Kennebec County Republican Committee and a full-time student at the University of Maine at Augusta. Williams is a Gardiner city councilor. The winner will face Rep. Gay Grant, D-Gardiner, in the November election.

The two candidates differ on whether to expand Medicaid in the state with federal funds. Ayotte said he wouldn’t have voted to expand the program, while Williams said he would be in favor of expanding Medicaid, although he does not support the Affordable Care Act.

SENATE DISTRICT 14

(Chelsea, Farmingdale, Gardiner, Hallowell, Manchester, Monmouth, Pittston, Randolph, Readfield, West Gardiner, Winthrop)

With Winthrop yet to report, David Bustin of Hallowell was headed to a commanding win over fellow Democrat Louis Sigel of Gardiner. The winner will face former Sen. Earle McCormick, R-West Gardiner.

In Randolph, Bustin got 52 votes to Sigel’s 35 and in Manchester Bustin got 126 votes and Sigel earned 33. In West Gardiner, Bustin received 85 votes and Sigel 47. Results from Hallowell show Bustin with 243 votes and Sigel 41.

Readfield reported 177 votes for Bustin and 30 for Sigel.

In Farmingdale, Bustin got 82 votes and Sigel 29, and in Pittston Bustin got 56 to Sigel’s 26. In Gardiner, Bustin got 182 to Sigel’s 133.

Bustin won Monmouth with 137 votes to Sigel’s 45 and Bustin took Chelsea with 45 votes to Sigel’s 10.

Bustin, 75, was first elected to the state Legislature in 1970 and served in the administration of former Gov. Joseph Brennan. He’s also a former Hallowell mayor and a retired labor dispute mediator.

Sigel, 70, is the secretary of the Kennebec County Democratic Committee and served on the platform committee for the state party. He’s a retired college professor.