HALLOWELL — Ann Berry of West Gardiner only felt ready to march in the Old Hallowell Day parade after the costumes she designed and made from curtains, sheets, pillow cases, table cloths and shower curtains won her group the first runner-up magazine prize.

“When that happened I said to this group at camp, we are going to go back to Hallowell where I grew up and go ‘ta da’; so that’s what we did,” she said.

Ta da indeed — Berry’s group of more than 25 women marching in handmade, old-time costumes won the “most original” prize handed out by Jane Orbeton, chair of the Old Hallowell Day Committee, at the noontime award ceremony.

Berry, who in 2008 created the Ladies Auxilary of the Farriers Association for the Prevention of Hoofrot group, said the costumes were something she and her camp friends had come up with for fun to wear during a game of croquet. But after winning the costume prize in Country Woman Magazine, she knew they were ready for the Old Hallowell Day parade.

Other parade prizes were issued for best environmental theme, best merchant entry, Old Hallowell spirit, favorite antique car, best performance and best overall. The last, also known as the grand marshal award, went to the dancing rubber duckies of the city neighborhood group NoHa.

Other parade prizes were issued for best environmental theme, best merchant entry, Old Hallowell spirit, favorite antique car, best performance and best overall. The last, also known as the grand marshal award, went to the dancing rubber duckies of the city neighborhood group NoHa.

Orbeton also presented Johanna Baker with the Timson Community Service award and Dick Bachelder with the Hallowell Citizen of the Year award.

While the parade drew hundreds to the street for about an hour, it was the wide array of other events that kept downtown hopping all day.

At Dom’s Barber Shop, which was celebrating its 75th anniversary, owner Patti Burnett handed out homemade cupcakes. Burnett said she’s owned Dom’s since 1999, but has worked there since 1978. Her favorite part of the community festivities are the generations of people everywhere.

“It’s beautiful,” she said.

Also popular was the pie contest, where the entries sold for $1 per slice. John Manning, one of the three judges, offered some tips on what he looks for in an award-winner.

“First its appearance, it has to have some eye appeal. Second, its taste and texture and whether it fulfills the expectations of the type of pie it’s supposed to be,” he said. He also admitted to having favorite kinds of pie, though he tries not to let that interfere with his judging.

“There are some pies I don’t favor as much as others, let’s put it that way. But you have to be impartial and you have to think about what it really is intending to be,” he said.

Lisa Lancaster of Hallowell had a banner year at the pie contest, taking the top slot in all three categories — one-crust, two-crust and savory. Her savory pie, lobster mac and cheese, also was tops in that category in 2010.

Booths selling arts, crafts and food lined the streets and live music and performances were also featured. The city bandstand on Water Street hosted groups including the Hallowell Community Band, Archie and Friends, Charlee Black Band and Timmy Sullivan and the Funk Punks.

Frisbee golf, bocce and air hockey tournaments were also available for those feeling competitive.

The day of events was capped off by a fireworks display.

 

Rebekah Metzler — 620-7016