The federal government auctioned off disaster-response trailers at fire-sale prices even as Harvey devastated southeast Texas, reducing an already diminished supply of mobile homes ahead of what could become the nation’s largest-ever housing mission.

More than 100 2017-model Federal Emergency Management Agency trailers were sold over the two days before the Category 4 hurricane landed in the Gulf Coast, an analysis of government data by The Associated Press found. Harvey already was projected to be a monster storm that would inflict unprecedented damage. The sales continued until Aug. 28, when floodwaters sent thousands of Texans onto rooftops and into shelters.

About 79,000 homes in the areas affected by the hurricane were flooded with 18 inches or more of water, Michael Byrne, FEMA’s federal disaster recovery coordinator for Harvey, told AP.

The auctions – about 300 since the beginning of the year – have left FEMA with a standing fleet of only 1,700 units. The agency has put out bids for another 4,500, but officials could not say when they would be ready to meet needs arising from Harvey, Irma and potentially future storms.

FEMA officials said that the units that were sold had housed survivors of last year’s floods in southern Louisiana and were unfit for redeployment.