WATERVILLE — Police have received about 600 leads during the criminal investigation into Ayla Reynolds’ disappearance.

That’s according to Department of Public Safety Spokesman Steve McCausland during a press conference today.

“All leads have been followed, and we’re looking for more,” he said.

The purpose of the press conference was to provide details on today’s search of the Kennebec River by dive teams, and where the investigation stands in its fourth week.

McCausland said investigators have “ruled out no scenarios, and ruled out no one.”

McCausland said one way to generate tips is by keeping the story alive in the media.

“We are encouraging all family members (of Ayla), both here in Waterville and Southern Maine to keep her story in the forefront and to keep her name in the headlines,” he said.

Lt. Kevin Adam of the Maine Warden Service said two dives teams — one from the warden service and one from the state police — searched the icy river below the Hathaway Creative Center on Water Street and directly below the Carter Memorial Bridge.

Justin DiPietro, Ayla’s father, said he learned about the river search on Tuesday.

“I spoke with investigators last night. They said, ‘Don’t be alarmed,'” DiPietro told the Morning Sentinel in a brief conversation.

In an interview with the Associated Press, DiPietro praised the police.

“They’ve taken a lot of criticism, and people don’t really know what’s going on behind the scenes. These men have been out there working, working since Day 1. They missed Christmas. They missed New Year’s with their families. They are doing everything they can to get my daughter home,” he said.

Waterville Police Chief Joseph Massey said all family members and those who were in the house the night Ayla was last seen have been cooperating. There were three adults and two children in the house, McCausland said, but investigators have declined to identify any of them other than DiPietro and his daughter.

On Dec. 17, DiPietro reported Ayla missing from their home on Violette Avenue.