LONDON — Dana Vollmer of the United States set a world record to win the 100-meter butterfly at the London Olympics on Sunday.

Vollmer led at the turn and hit the wall in 55.98 seconds to shave 0.08 off the previous mark set by Sarah Sjostrom of Sweden at the 2009 world championships in Rome.

Vollmer had set an Olympic record in Saturday morning’s heats. She missed qualifying for the 2008 Beijing Games.

Lu Ying of China touched second in 56.87 and Alicia Coutts of Australia finished third in 56.94.

Sjostrom was fourth.

Cameron van der Burgh of South Africa set a world record to win the men’s 100-meter breast stroke.

Van der Burgh clocked 58.46 seconds, 0.12 seconds better than the mark set by Brenton Rickard of Australia at the 2009 world championships in Rome.

Christian Sprenger of Australia took silver in 58.93 and Brendan Hansen of the United States claimed bronze in 59.49.

Two-time defending champion Kosuke Kitajima of Japan finished fifth.

Camille Muffat of France edged Allison Schmitt of the United States by less than half a stroke to win the Olympic 400-meter freestyle.

Muffat clocked an Olympic-record 4 minutes, 1.45 seconds, while Schmitt was second in 4:01.77.

Defending champion and local favorite Rebecca Adlington made a late charge to take bronze in 4:03.01 for Britain’s first swimming medal in the London Games.

Two-time world champion Federica Pellegrini of Italy finished fifth.

France upset favored Australia and the United States, which included Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte, to win the 4×100-meter freestyle relay.

The Americans led all the way until Yannick Agnel pulled ahead of Lochte in the final lap.

France clocked 3 minutes, 9.93 seconds, and the Americans settled for silver in 3:10.38. Russia took bronze in 3:11.41.

Prerace favorite Australia was fourth.

It was sweet revenge for the French, who lost a close race to the Americans in Beijing four years ago.

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