Just days ago President Donald Trump had launched 59 missiles at a cost of $1 million each at an air base in Syria. Why? He says because chemical-laden bombs were deployed from that air base upon Syrian people, some of whom were women and children. He forgot to mention that Bashir Assad had already killed 100,000 people (rebels, Isis and civilians) in a civil war. Seems he had plenty of reasons for the missile strike long before the chemical weapon attack.

I guess we only count chemical weapons since the end of World War II. Here’s a news flash. All bombs are made with chemicals. Ask any chemist. While you are asking questions, ask who bombed directly and/or through its allies since WWII?

I did a little research. Since World War II, the U.S. and/or its allies, using mostly American-made arms, have killed 32.1 million people with weapons made with chemicals (bombs, missiles, bullets, etc.). To name a few, alphabetically: Afghanistan, 1.8 million; Angola, 300,000; Bolivia, 400; Cambodia, 2 million; Chad, 40,000; Chile, 3,000; Colombia, 67,000; Cuba, 3,000; Congo, 3.3 million; Dominican Republic, 3,000; East Timor, 200,000; Grenada, 277; Haiti, 65,000; Honduras, 400; Hungary, 3,000; Indonesia, 1.4 million; Iran, 262,000; Iraq I, 350,000; Iraq II, 600,000; Korea, 3 million. A total of 13.1 million dead.

In 15 more countries from Laos to Yugoslavia, 19 million more were killed either by the U.S. or its allies (or silent partners, if you will).

In Korea alone, the U.S. and its allies dropped more than 650,000 tons of bombs, of which 43,000 tons were napalm.

So, condemn the Syrian leadership, and rightfully so. Assad is not a nice man. But look around to see the real bomb droppers. Ask yourself. Do I have the courage to see the truth?

Peter P. Sirois

Madison