The work of Sherry Dec, Marianne Swittlinger and Pat Ryan will be featured through Tuesday, July 10, at the Gibbs Library, at 40 Union Road in Washington.

A reception for the Maine artists is set for 7 p.m. Friday, May 11. Attendees can meet the artists as they celebrate this springtime show.

Dec grew up in Kennebunk She graduated from the University of Maine and taught language arts for 37 years in the Mid-Coast area. Retiring from teaching, she decided to study oil painting. She has written poetry all her life and wanted to bring this imagery into her work.

Swittlinger is originally from Connecticut where she was a working artist and art teacher for more than 20 years. Coming from a family of artists, she was inspired at an early age to paint, draw and craft.

She moved to Maine in 1999, where she was an Artist’s Way facilitator for many years. She is also a founding member of the Girl Ain’t Right Group, which is now the Port Clyde Art Gallery in Port Clyde, where she has been a working member and manager for 10 years.

Her teepee series has been shown in the Art Guild in Farmington, Connecticut, Gallery on the Green in Canton, Connecticut and the Sea Studio Gallery in Tenants Harbor. These works represent a 10-year journey through the art, symbolism and lifestyle of Native American culture, spirituality and imagery.

Her artwork is eclectic and personal and incorporates colorful images of familiar subjects as well as mixed media, photography, jewelry and three-dimensional shrines. Her work is shown at the Port Clyde Art Gallery in the village of Port Clyde.

Ryan has lived in Mid-Coast Maine for 42 years, residing with two dogs in Cushing. Her art education began with classes in photography.

Her primary medium is oil on canvas, focusing on life in Maine and portraits of its people. She uses strong color and paints in a loose manner. This winter she has started using charcoal again focusing on people’s faces. She has shown her paintings in various galleries including the Port Clyde Gallery in Port Clyde, River Arts in Damariscotta and The Highland Gallery in Thomaston.