New England is expected to broil just days before the official start of summer.

Daytime high temperatures inland in southern and western Maine will rise to the mid-90s by Monday. Because of moisture in the air, it could feel much hotter, said Derek Schroeter, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Gray.

“With the humidity, it feels like temperatures will be like 95 to 100,” he said.

Meteorologists are tracking possible severe thunderstorms that could bring strong winds, drenching rain and hail across New England and Upstate New York.

“All this heat and humidity building in on Monday is fuel for thunderstorms,” Schroeter said.

A cold front projected to move into the region Monday afternoon and evening should provide some relief, but midweek daytime temperatures will still be in the 80s, he said.

The heat spike is expected to be more intense in southern New England.

Forecasters say temperatures in Boston on Monday could approach or even top the record of 94 degrees set back in 1929 for that date.

A number of school districts are taking precautions.

Students in Enfield, Connecticut, will be dismissed after a half-day Monday, WSFB-TV reported, and other districts are considering steps as well.

School officials in Lowell, Massachusetts, say they’re considering canceling classes Monday because heat can easily get trapped in the city’s aging, brick school buildings, posing a danger for students and staff. A decision is expected Sunday.

In Maine, the primary concern is that people will take risks in the ocean and freshwater lakes and ponds, which will be 30 to 40 degrees cooler than the air, Schroeter said.

If someone capsized in a boat or was in the water for a long time, it could result in hypothermia, he added.

“The heat is probably going to lure people to the beaches. We just want them to be wary if they are going out on a paddleboard or a kayak.”

This report includes material from the Associated Press.

 

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