BOSTON — Ian Kinsler swatted a two-out RBI single in the second inning.

In the fifth inning, Kinsler led off by grounding out. He trotted back to the dugout and made sure he had a good view. Even after Jackie Bradley Jr. popped out, Kinsler stayed attentive.

“We’re constantly trying to make things happen, regardless of how many outs,” Kinsler said.

But coming to bat was Christian Vazquez, the No. 9 hitter known for his catching, not his hitting.

Sure enough, Vazquez fell behind 0-2 to Los Angeles Dodgers starter Hyun-Jin Ryu, who had retired seven straight batters.

Vazquez fouled off a cutter, and then took an inside fastball. Ryu started to head toward his dugout, thinking strikeout. But the pitch was just off he plate and called a ball. Ryu came with another cutter, and Vazquez singled to right.

“That sums up the ballclub right there,” Kinsler said. “Vazquez fought for every inch, and fired one to right field to get the whole thing started.”

The whole thing was a three-run rally, all with two outs, as the Red Sox topped Los Angeles 4-2 Wednesday night. Boston holds a 2-0 lead in the World Series and shows no sign of slowing down.

“We’re a confident bunch,” Kinsler said.

And what of the Dodgers? Their left-hander was one strike away from an eighth straight out and keeping the lead. Instead, Ryu did not finish the inning, and the Dodgers were behind.

“That’s huge,” Red Sox pitcher David Price said. “To have nobody on base with two outs and to start a rally like that, that can deflate a team.”

Price has had his deflating moments in the postseason, but he’s now on a roll, 2-0 in his last two starts. He looked in big trouble in the fourth, with the bases loaded and no outs, but contained the damage, allowing two runs.

“It could have spun out of control pretty fast,” Price said. “It’s been one of my Achilles heels, especially in the playoffs.”

Price shut the Dodgers down after that. He, Joe Kelly, Nathan Eovaldi and Craig Kimbrel retired the last 16 Dodgers.

Impressive pitching. But it would have been for naught if the Red Sox offense did not shine with two outs.

“Putting the ball in play in (certain) situations is very important,” said Red Sox Manager Alex Cora, referring to Vazquez’s line-drive single to right in the fifth inning, followed by Mookie Betts’ single to center.

Dodgers Manager Dave Roberts watched the inning unfold.

“(Ryu) had Vazquez 1-2 and gives up a base hit on a backdoor cutter. With Mookie, he gives up a ground-ball base hit,” Roberts said. “I thought (Ryu) was in control the entire night.”

But Ryu cold not put the Red Sox away. Andrew Benintendi followed Betts. He and Ryu dug in. After three catcher visits to Ryu – and Benintendi stepping out of the box when Ryu took too long – Benintendi worked an eight-pitch walk to load the bases to chase Ryu.

Roberts called on right-handed reliever Ryan Madson. He walked Steve Pearce, tying the game.

All of this with two outs.

“That was a great example of just how you grind out an inning, grind out at-bats,” said designated hitter J.D. Martinez. “Finding ways to get guys on and keeping the line moving.”

Martinez followed Pearce. The man known for his homers was not thinking grand slam. Martinez had struck out against Madson in a similar situation in Game 1.

“I kind of made the adjustment, going up there and trusting my eyes,” Martinez said.

“We’re hitters before sluggers … I take pride in hitting and being – not just a one-dimensional hitter (but) a complete hitter.”

So, in agreement with Cora, Martinez was looking to put the ball in play.

Martinez muscled a 1-0 inside fastball to right field, breaking the tie with two runs and a 4-2 lead.

“We go up there and the pitch dictates what we’re going to do,” Martinez said.

The Red Sox seem to be dictating play in this World Series. They are difficult to keep down.

“It’s a good lineup,” Roberts said. “They got a big hit when they needed it.”

Kevin Thomas can be contacted at 791-6411 or at:

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Twitter: KevinThomasPPH

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