Regarding the vaccine controversy, as far back as 2011, two reasonable bills were introduced in our Legislature. One required doctors to give parents a list of all the ingredients in childhood vaccines. The other made it easier for children to stay in school without being immunized. Unfortunately, these bills did not pass, so we are faced with fighting the “mandatory vaccine” machine again.

In order to sway public opinion, the pharmaceutical, medical and media domains have all joined together to negate the well-researched testimony of parents. The effects of giving multiple vaccines at the same time could significantly pose a risk to some children — like overloading an electrical system.

But the powers-that-be routinely pass off these legitimate concerns as fringe opinions. What arrogance. Parents are not stupid, and they are quickly learning to question these supposed authorities and their “herd immunity” concept.  (It all sounds more like a desire to create a “herd mentality.”)

Those who believe that multiple inoculations are effective should have their children vaccinated. But those of us who are concerned – and are fully aware that 40 doses of vaccines are given to children before the age of 6 – want no part of the legislation that mandates such a law.

 

Pat Truman

Hallowell


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