COLLEGES

Vanderbilt’s football game at Missouri on Saturday has been postponed because COVID-19 issues have left the Commodores without enough players.

The Southeastern Conference announced Monday the game has been tentatively rescheduled for Dec. 12. It is the first SEC game rescheduled due to COVID-19-related problems and the 28th FBS game overall to be postponed or canceled since Aug. 26.

The SEC started a conference-only schedule Sept. 26, a few weeks later than the rest of the FBS conferences that began play in September.

Vanderbilt (0-3) played with only 56 scholarship players last week in a loss to South Carolina.

• Syracuse preseason All-American defensive standout Andre Cisco will miss the rest of the season, coach Dino Babers said Monday toward the end of his weekly news conference.

Cisco was inserted as the rover in the Orange’s new 3-3-5 defensive scheme and had 11 tackles and one interception in the two games he played. He was injured in a freak collision with a teammate in pregame warmups for the Georgia Tech game in the Carrier Dome just over two weeks ago and hadn’t played since.

• Kansas State quarterback Skylar Thompson will miss the rest of the season after having surgery on his throwing shoulder, leaving freshman Will Howard to lead the No. 22 Wildcats the rest of the way.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL: Kennesaw State Coach Agnus Berenato is taking a leave of absence following recent surgery for breast cancer.

Berenato, the former Pittsburgh and Georgia Tech coach, announced her diagnosis with cancer on Sept. 28, 2019. She had surgery on Oct. 1 and says she plans to take a leave of absence until spring of 2021.

Khadija Head, the associate head coach, will serve as interim coach. Head also coached with Berenato at Pittsburgh.

SWIMMING: Officials at UNC Wilmington say a COVID-19 cluster has developed with the school’s swimming and diving team. A statement from the school on Monday said seven cases were discovered with the team. State health officials define a cluster as five or more cases that are considered in close proximity by location in the last 14 days.

According to the school, the individuals involved have been and/or are isolating and have been receiving medical monitoring and/or treatment as needed. The university said it had informed the New Hanover County Health Department, and contact tracing has been initiated with direct communication to anyone determined to have been in close contact with a COVID-19-positive individual.

TRACK AND FIELD

MOORE DIES AT 91: Charlie Moore, the 400-meter hurdles champion at the 1952 Helsinki Olympics, has died. He was 91.

Moore died Thursday from pancreatic cancer, according to World Athletics. Cornell University also confirmed the passing of the school’s former athletic director and star athlete.

Moore won the 400 hurdles in the rain in 1952 in 50.8 seconds to tie the Olympic record he set in the quarterfinals. Moore also earned a silver medal in Helsinki on the United States’ 1,600-meter relay team. After the Olympics, he set a world record of 51.6 in the 440 hurdles at the British Empire Games in London.

Charles Moore Jr. grew up in Pennsylvania and was a standout at Mercersburg Academy before going on to Cornell. He was inducted into Cornell’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 1978 and the USA Track and Field Hall in 1999. Moore donated his two Olympic medals to Mercersburg Academy.

SOCCER

PREMIER LEAGUE: Five people on English Premier League clubs have tested positive for the coronavirus in the latest round of testing.

There were nine cases the previous week. From Oct. 5-11, there were 1,128 players and club officials tested.

The five people who were positive were having to self-isolate for 10 days.

MLS: Black Players for Change, a group of Major League Soccer players, has teamed up with the LeBron James-led nonprofit More Than A Vote to encourage voting in the Nov. 3 election.

“The most important thing we can do as athletes in this moment to combat the systemic racism and persistent injustice that plagues our nation is to encourage all of our fans to join us by getting off of the sidelines and into the ballot box,” Portland Timbers forward Jeremy Ebobisse said.

Black Players for Change, which includes more than 170 MLS players and staff members, released a video Monday, “We’re in Stoppage Time,” which includes the voices of Toronto FC’s Justin Morrow, a BPC founder, and Chris Wondolowski, the league’s all-time leading scorer, who is of Native American descent.

James was among the athletes and artists who started More Than a Vote in June. The group, which also seeks to fight voter suppression, has already signed up more than 10,000 poll workers.

TENNIS

ST. PETERSBURG OPEN: Stan Wawrinka saved three match points to achieve a comeback win over Dan Evans and reach the second round, after the tournament was disrupted by an unnamed player’s coronavirus case.

Serving to stay in the match at 5-6 down in the second, Wawrinka gave Evans three chances to seal the match but saved them all and then won the second-set tiebreaker and deciding set to complete a 3-6, 7-6 (3), 7-5 victory. Wawrinka saved a match point in a win over Evans before, when he went on to win the 2016 U.S. Open.

Wawrinka next plays Evgeny Donskoy after the Russian wild card beat Egor Gerasimov 6-4, 7-6 (4).

An unnamed tennis player was withdrawn from the event after testing positive for the coronavirus, the ATP Tour said on Monday. The tour added the player was in isolation and “is currently asymptomatic,” and efforts were underway to identify people with whom the player had contact.

AUTO RACING

INDYCAR: Oliver Askew and Arrow McLaren SP will part ways at the end of this IndyCar season, a rookie year disrupted by a concussion suffered in the Indianapolis 500.

The Arrow team said Monday that Askew will compete in the Oct. 25 season finale if he’s medically cleared but has been released to look for a new job in 2021.

The 23-year-old missed two races earlier this month at Indianapolis Motor Speedway while working on a recovery plan with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s sports medicine concussion program. Askew suffered the concussion in an Aug. 23 crash but competed in four races before he was diagnosed.

Askew’s performance dipped dramatically after Indianapolis and he didn’t reveal his health struggles out of fear of losing his job.

“We believe that Oliver has a great deal of talent and potential for the future. He has had an incredibly difficult rookie year, with a lack of overall track time and recent medical issues,” Arrow McLaren SP co-owner Sam Schmidt said in a statement. “We want to give Oliver the time to pursue new opportunities for 2021 and the ability to race at St Pete. Come the end of the year, we will wish Oliver the very best in all of his future endeavors and he will always be a friend of the team.”

 


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