Lilly Havens, 8, corrals a trailer full of turkeys at Greaney’s Turkey Farm in Mercer on Saturday, November 21, 2020. Havens is a third generation cousin of the Greaney’s. Extended family working in the slaughter house is as much of the tradition of Thanksgiving as eating the turkey. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Janet Weeks reaches out to touch the glass of the door separating her from her mother, Jeanne Jacques, with her granddaughter Mikaela Pollard, 4, on Jacques 90th birthday at Northern Light Continuing Care Lakewood on Kennedy Memorial Drive in Waterville on Friday, March 20, 2020. The coronavirus has suspended all visitors from the facility to protect some of the most vulnerable population from the pandemic. “It’s the first time in 62 years I haven’t been able to embrace my mother on her birthday.” Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Gay Mayhue settles in to the empty seats for the encore performance of the Bolshoi Ballet from Moscow shows for four people an attendance at the 850 seat Waterville Opera House in Waterville on Sunday, March 15, 2020 as the coronavirus national emergency goes in to effect. This will be the last show of any kind at the opera house for at least two weeks. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Aiden McGinty, 13, left, and Xavier Rodriguez, 14, right, each do a flip in to the Kennebec River from the pedestrian bridge in Skowhegan on Friday, September 11, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

The Waterville Senior High School’s bench cheers after a three-pointer against Hermon High School in the Class B North championship game at the Cross Insurance Center in Bangor on Saturday, February 22, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Winslow police officer John Veilluex walks toward a Kim’s Garage wrecker at the scene of multiple cars in the ditch on China Road in Winslow on Saturday, Dec. 5, 2020. Heavy snow blanketed the area causing treacherous driving conditions. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Daja Gombojav prays with her family during Easter service at St. Joseph’s Maronite Church in Waterville on Sunday, April 12, 2020. Worship restrictions are in place to curb the coronavirus infection numbers. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

David Jones, fire chief for the Norridgewock fire department, stands for a portrait at the department in Norridgewock on Wednesday, February 26, 2020. Jones is requesting $50 thousand from the town of Norridgewock to hire two more firefighters to cover the region. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Comet NEOWISE reflects in Bog Stream at the northwest part of North Pond as the sun sets over North Pond in Smithfield, Maine, USA, on Friday, July 17, 2020. The celestial visitor is visible after sunset in the northwest night sky just below the Big Dipper or Ursa Major. My vision for this photo project was to offer a sense of time and place for the comet. When the comet floated by 6,800 years ago, the planet was a much, much different place during the Holecene Era. Civilization had just started to develop in the Fertile Crescent region, known as Mesopotamia. That would be Iraq today. The chicken and horse were finally domesticated and the potter’s wheel was invented. The comet NEOWISE or C/2020 F3, bound by the gravity of the sun, is hanging above earth like an ornament in the northwest sky. The comet was only discovered on March 27 of this year. It’s easy to let such an event fall through the cracks while humanity grapples with a global pandemic and civil unrest. The comet was a welcomed distraction. And to be able to brag about photographing an object moving at 144,000 mph while standing on another object moving in another direction at 1,000 mph using a tripod from the sitting position without my beer foaming up is worth the effort. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Neowise dashes across the sky as the sun sets at Robbins Hill Scenic Overlook on Old Canada Road in Solon on Wednesday, July 15, 2020. The celestial visitor is visible after sunset in the northwest night sky just below the Big Dipper or Ursa Major. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Light flickers from a tv in the second floor of a farm in Clinton as comet NEOWISE officially named C/2020 F3 appears to hover in the sky while traveling at 144,000 mph 64 million miles away on it’s 6,800 year trip past earth on July 21, 2020. When the comet passed 6,800 years ago, the planet was a different place 5,000 years into the Holocene Era, which began after the last ice age. Civilization had started to develop in the Fertile Crescent region of Mesopotamia, which is Iraq today. The chicken and horse were domesticated and the potter’s wheel was invented. These ideas motivated me to capture the comet NEOWISE in the context of the farms, nature and structures that exist now and that will certainly be gone when it next passes by. I hope the pictures last long enough for people to compare what life looked like when NEOWISE passed over humans on planet Earth in 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Traffic heads south on Interstae-95 as seen from Quarry Road in Waterville on Monday, July 20, 2020 as NEOWISE shines in the night sky. Modern day we have cameras, automated vehicles, internet, people in space, a rover on Mars and satellites in the outer reaches of space to just name a few advancements in humanity. A far cry from finally getting chicken on demand and riding a horse that listens to you. What will the planet look like when NEOWISE passes again? Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

First responders from Delta Ambulance and Waterville police and fire remove a man from his home in full PPE in Waterville on Friday, April 17, 2020. Any cardiac event triggers a full PPE response by all responders. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Chris Mitchell, a paramedic and supervisor for Delta Ambulance, dons his protective suit as he prepares to enter a home during an emergency call in Waterville on Friday, April 17, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Nathaniel Lombardi, an Advanced Emergency Medical Technician with Delta Ambulance and his partner Rebecca Quinn, a paramedic with Delta Ambulance, remove a patient from an assisted living facility as family reflected in the ambulance window watch from a distance on May 21, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Corie McCarthy, a paramedic with Delta Ambulance, treats Larry Gagnon during a transfer from Inland Hospital to Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor on November 17, 2020. Gagnon tested positive for Covid-19. The lack of staff has a ripple effect throughout the healthcare continuum, according to Petrie. “Even without COVID, EMS in Maine, we need help. We’re struggling for personnel … and coupled with that our hospitals are in trouble in the state and are struggling to figure out how they are going to operate. And EMS is part of that equation. We move their patients. We assist in their communities, and so we need to look for other alternatives as well.” Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

An elderly woman is lifted in to a waiting stretcher by paramedics from Winslow fire department in Waterville on Sunday, May 10, 2020. Maine is one of the oldest states in the country creating a very vulnerable population highly susceptible to the coronavirus. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

A patient attempts to climb into a waiting ambulance after suffering adverse effects from crystal meth at Walmart in Waterville on Nov. 28, 2020. Drug overdose and anxiety calls have been steadily rising since the beginning of the pandemic. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

A patient struggles to breath with the assistance of oxygen from Damian Brockway, Delta paramedic, in the back truck 3 of Delta Ambulance on May 3, 2020. The paramedics have seen a rise in calls of difficulty breathing the past week. While Maine enjoyed low case numbers and few deaths during the dry, warm summer where space facilitated distancing, the colder, wetter fall has driven people inside. Schools have started up again and the case numbers and deaths have risen. A major source of stress now confronts emergency medical services providers: staffing. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Rebecca Quinn, paramedic, feels the vein on the arm of a woman suffering from Covid-19 symptoms as Nathaniel Lombardi, AEMT, right, step up an IV in the back of the ambulance in Fairfield on Dec.21, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Damian Brockway, paramedic, checks the breathing of a possible Covid-19 patient with the help of partner Nathaniel Lombardi, AEMT, on May 3, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Damian Brockway, paramedic, and partner, Nathaniel Lombardi, donned in their PPE, return to Delta base in Waterville to decontaminate the ambulance after a suspected Covid-19 call on May 3, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Nathaniel Lombardi, AEMT, disinfects the cab of the ambulance after a call in Waterville on Sunday, April 19, 2020. This procedure is completed after every call. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Mike Tuttle, a 30-year veteran of paramedicine, grabs a quick nap in the crew room at Delta Ambulance base on May 25, 2020. He’s on hour 22 of a 24 hour shift. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Alewives run up the Sebasticook River in Benton as Brandon Bezio, center, and Tommy Keister, right, hauls a net of the silver fish in Benton on Friday, May 22, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Ernie Wallace and Tommy Kiester haul a net of alewives in to a waiting crate at the Benton Falls Dam on the Sebasticook River in Benton on Tuesday, May 19, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Jacob Howard, a senior at Unity College studying fisheries and wildlife management, monitors the flow of alewives over the dam at the Benton Falls Dam on the Sebasticook River in Benton on Friday, May 23, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Life on the Kennebec River. The 170-mile long river that starts at Moosehead Lake and flows to the Atlantic Ocean once was the commerce highway for Maine. A culture and lifestyle has evolved from the early days of industrial expansion and running logs to a more healthy and sustainable environment that we see today. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

An angler tries to haul in a fish with a fly on the Kennebec River in Waterville on Tuesday, June 16, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Walter Middleton, 13, holds on to the rope swing as he cools off in the Kennebec River with his friends in Waterville on Tuesday, June 16, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Kyle Velleux paddles out to the island on the Kennebec River in the still of the darkness on June 24, 2020. “The fishing is the best after midnight.” he said. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Anglers take advantage of the cooler nights for both a better run of fish and relief from the sunshine as a drought and high temperatures continue in Waterville on June 26, 2020. An angler baits his line from the island in the middle of the Kennebec River by the Lockwood Hydroelectric Facility. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Skiers take advantage of the only snow at a nordic ski area in the state of Maine at Quarry Road Trails in Waterville on Dec. 29, 2020. Maine has been experiencing drought conditions over the previous 12 months leaving little help from mother Nature to supply skiers with powder. Quarry Road Trails, a donation driven entity, has built the most impressive nordic ski area in the state of Maine offering over 40 kilometers of groomed nordic trails with snow making capabilities. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Caleb Cote, a junior at Messalonskee High School helps other volunteers make snow at Quarry Road Trails on Sunday, Dec. 6, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Wally Donovan, a snowmaking volunteer, checks the pressurized water and air combo on a snow gun at Quarry Road Trails in Waterville on Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Chad Sisson adjusts a snow gun as a crew of volunteers make snow at Quarry Road Trails in Waterville on Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Justin Ferhenstien inspects the consistency of the snow as he inspects the snow guns at Quarry Road Trails in Waterville on Dec.16, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

A young child named Maggie, 4, climbs a mound of man-made snow at Quarry Road Trails in Waterville on Dec.16, 2020. Quarry Road Trails is the only nordic center in Maine with snow. The unseasonable weather has left much of Maine bare of snow. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo

Skiers hit the trails as the sun shines through man-made snow in the air in Waterville on Dec.15, 2020. Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel Buy this Photo


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