On National Maine Day (Dec. 21), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development Maine State Director Rhiannon Hampson announced that eight Maine businesses are receiving a total of $514,000 in grants through the Rural Energy for America Program.

These grant are in addition to an $82.4 million Hampson announced earlier in the month to combat climate change, invest in infrastructure, expand economic opportunities, and rehabilitate homes in rural Maine, according to a USDA news release.

The following organizations are receiving funds to install energy efficient and renewable energy systems in rural businesses throughout Maine:

• T&D Wood Energy in Sanford, will receive $190,700 to purchase a diesel-powered, horizontal grinder and an existing green hammermill with a turnkey green grinding system. The new system provides a more robust, safe and energy efficient green grinding system. The project will eliminate the current process that uses over 24,000 gallons of diesel fuel per year. This will reduce combustion of diesel fuel and nitrogen oxide and carbon dioxide emissions from portable engines on-site.

• Maine Timber Mats in New Portland, will receive $86,396 to purchase a new biomass boiler system to provide heat for the entire multi-building sawmill. The new system will replace existing low- efficiency solid and fossil fuel heating boilers.

• Community Shellfish Company in Bremen will receive $85,666 to build a 172-kilowatt solar photovoltaic system. It is expected to generate 215,370 kilowatt-hours and save the farm $27,249 annually. According to the EPA, this is the equivalent to powering 19.2 homes annually and having greenhouse gas emissions avoided by 52.8 tons of waste recycled instead of landfilled.

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• A&A Market, a small convenience store in Corrina, will receive $42,343 to build a 65.2-kilowatt solar photovoltaic system. It is expected to generate 67,849 kilowatt-hours annually with an estimated annual cost savings of $12,819. This is the equivalent to powering 9.4 homes for one-year and the equivalent to greenhouse gas emissions avoided by 16.6 tons of waste recycled instead of landfilled.

• The Grant-Tates Building, a small-scale redevelopment company in Bath, will receive $29,132 to install a new solar photovoltaic system. It is expected to generate 41,500 kilowatt-hours per year. This is the equivalent to powering 5.7 homes for one year and the equivalent to greenhouse gas emissions avoided by 10.2 tons of waste recycled instead of landfilled.

• 93 Coffee in Kingfield will receive $28,838 to build a 36.8-kilowatt solar photovoltaic system. It is expected to generate 48,620 kilowatt-hours annually with an estimated annual cost savings of $6,828. This is the equivalent to powering 6.7 homes for one year and the equivalent to greenhouse gas emissions avoided by 11.9 tons of waste recycled instead of landfilled.

• William Sproul, owner of T&B Transmission Services in Chelsea, will receive $26,820 to build a 45.6-kilowatt solar photovoltaic system. It is expected to generate 58,380 kilowatt-hours annually. This is the equivalent to powering 8.1 homes for one year and equivalent to greenhouse gas emissions avoided of 4.3 tons of waste recycled instead of landfilled.

• S.P. Real Estate in Fort Kent will receive $24,105 to build a 98.4-kilowatt solar photovoltaic system. It is expected to generate 153,854 kilowatt-hours annually with an estimated annual cost savings of $9,123. This is the equivalent to powering 21.2 homes for one year and the equivalent to greenhouse gas emissions avoided by 37.7 tons of waste recycled instead of landfilled.

To learn more about the Rural Energy for America Program, email Brian Wilson, business and cooperative programs director, at [email protected].

For more information, visit rd.usda.gov.

 

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