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Comet first person 0726

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    Comet first person 0726 - Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel | of | Share this photo

    Comet NEOWISE reflects in Bog Stream at the northwest part of North Pond as the sun sets Friday, July 17, over North Pond in Smithfield. The celestial visitor is visible after sunset in the northwest night sky just below the Big Dipper or Ursa Major.

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    Comet first person 0726 - Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel | of | Share this photo

    Comet NEOWISE dangles Friday, July 17, over the Lamphere farm in Mercer.

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    Comet first person 0726 - Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel | of | Share this photo

    Light flickers from a TV on the second floor of a farm in Clinton as Comet NEOWISE, officially named C/2020 F3, appears to hover in the sky Tuesday, July 21. In reality, the comet is traveling at 144,000 mph some 64 million miles away on its 6,800 year trip past Earth.

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    Comet first person 0726 - Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel | of | Share this photo

    Traffic heads south on Interstate 95 as seen from Quarry Road in Waterville on Monday, July 20, as Comet NEOWISE shines in the night sky.

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    Comet first person 0726 - Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel | of | Share this photo

    A car travels on the access road at Robbins Hill Scenic Overlook on Old Canada Road in Solon on Wednesday, July 15, as Comet NEOWISE hovers over the horizon.

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    Comet first person 0726 - Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel | of | Share this photo

    The International Space Station passes between earth and Comet NEOWISE in the northwest sky as seen Wednesday, July 15, from Robbins Hill Scenic Overlook on Old Canada Road in Solon.

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    Comet first person 0726 - Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel | of | Share this photo

    Comet NEOWISE, officially named C/2020 F3, hangs over a barn in Clinton on Tuesday, July 21.

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    Comet first person 0726 - Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel | of | Share this photo

    Kyle Grantham, a professional photographer from Delaware, makes a picture of the Milky Way after making pictures Tuesday, July 21, of his true objective, Comet NEOWISE, at the water's edge of the Narrows on North Pond in Smithfield. The celestial event happens once every 6,800 years, making it a unique experience justifying the 1,200 mile round trip for only 4 hours of shooting.

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    Comet first person 0726 - Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel | of | Share this photo

    Brake lights from a car traveling on Bog Road in Smithfield illuminate the low lying fog over Bog Stream at North Pond as Comet NEOWISE appears through a window of clouds in the northwest sky on Thursday, July 23.

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    Comet first person 0726 - Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel | of | Share this photo

    Thunderstorms yielded an ethereal scene in Smithfield on Thursday, July 23. The Comet NEOWISE is waning as it leaves our sky and speeds away from the sun. Each night, the hunk of space matter gets smaller and smaller in the sky. Soon it won't be visible to the naked eye. If one looks closely, it's possible to see NEOWISE mid frame on the right above the dash from an orbiting satellite.

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    Comet first person 0726 - Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel | of | Share this photo

    Comet NEOWISE makes an appearance at Robbins Hill Scenic Overlook on Old Canada Road in Solon on Wednesday, July 15, as the sun sets. After several nights of stellar bliss, the comet is returning to the outer reaches of the solar system.

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    Comet first person 0726 - Michael G. Seamans/Morning Sentinel | of | Share this photo

    Comet NEOWISE hangs like an ornament in the northwest sky at Robbins Hill Scenic Overlook on Old Canada Road in Solon on Wednesday, July 15. Comet NEOWISE was detected on March 27 of this year by NASA's Near Earth Orbit Wide-Infrared Explorer, a space craft launched in December 2009. The visitor from the outer reaches of the solar system was visible after sunset in the northwest night sky just below the Big Dipper or Ursa Major but is now waning as it travels toward the outer reaches once again.

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