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Crustacean Hall of Fame

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - Photo courtesy of Alex Todd | of | Share this photo

    The white lobster probably has a genetic condition called Leucism, which is a partial loss of pigment, according to a post on the Maine Coast Fishermen's Association Facebook page. That's why hints of blue are visible on the shell and in its eyes. The lobster was caught by Alex Todd of Cheabeague Island late in August.

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - | of | Share this photo

    This lobster caught and released in Friendship, Maine, was estimated to be 75 years old. The photo, taken by Ricky Louis Felice Jr. , was posted on WCSH-TV's twitter feed on Monday, July 13, 2015.

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - | of | Share this photo

    Bill Coppersmith of Windham holds a normal looking lobster next to a bright orange lobster that he caught while fishing in deepwater canyons in the Gulf of Maine with his steersman Brian Skillings. Gabe Souza/Staff Photographer

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - Staff photo by David Leaming | of | Share this photo

    Jenny Peterson, a 201 Market employee, holds a rare calico lobster at the Skowhegan business on Thursday. Owner Chris Foster said the lobster is not for sale and he’ll probably donate it to an aquarium.

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - . Staff photo by David Leaming | of | Share this photo

    A rare calico lobster, at left, beside a normal lobster at 201 Market store in Skowhegan on Thursday.

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - | of | Share this photo

    In this November 12, 1997 file photo William Coppersmith holds a white lobster he caught in Casco Bay. Jack Milton/Staff Photographer

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - | of | Share this photo

    An orange-brown split colored lobster was photographed at the Pine Point Fisherman's Co-Op on Monday, July 6, 2015. The lobsterman who caught it is unknown, but it arrived at the Co-Op last week. According to research by the Lobster Institute, the chances of finding a split colored lobster is one in 50 million. Only the albino lobster, one in 100 million, is rarer than the split-colored lobster, according to the institute. Yoon S. Byun/Staff Photographer

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - Yoon S. Byun/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    A claw view of the rare lobster shows the difference in color of its appendages. According to research by the Lobster Institute, the chances of finding a split colored lobster is one in 50 million. Only the albino lobster, one in 100 million, is rarer than the split-colored lobster, according to the institute.

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - Yoon S. Byun/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    Ted Hyatt, 12, of New Fairfield, Connecticut, handles the orange-brown lobster at the Pine Point Fisherman’s Co-Op on Monday, July 6, 2015..

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - Courtesy photo | of | Share this photo

    These two albino lobsters being held at Owls Head Lobster Co. are destined for new homes: One will go to the Maine State Aquarium in Boothbay Harbor. The other will go to Brooks Trap Mill, a lobstering supply store in Thomaston with a tank full of marine life.

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - Photo courtesy Jay LaPlante | of | Share this photo

    Only about 1 in 2 million lobsters is blue – like this one, hauled in off Pine Point in Scarborough – according to the Lobster Institute at the University of Maine.

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - Gregory Rec/Staff Photographer | of | Share this photo

    "Little Boy Blue," a rare blue lobster, is held by waitress Melissa Hamilton at Becky's Diner In Portland.

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - The Associated Press | of | Share this photo

    Many experts say that true calico lobsters are the second most rare, at one in 30 to 50 million. The rarest is an albino – one in 100 million lobsters.

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - The Associated Press | of | Share this photo

    Ellen Goethel, a marine biologist and owner of Explore the Ocean World Oceanarium in Hampton, N.H., holds a calico lobster caught by Capt. Josiah Beringer.

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - Photo Courtesy Marybeth Jeitner | of | Share this photo

    Marybeth Jeitner of Flagler Beach, Fla., bought this rare yellow lobster from a Publix supermarket and eventually got it to the Seacoast Science Center in Rye, N.H. Jeitner had no temptation to eat the 2.5-pound lobster – she's a vegan.

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    Crustacean Hall of Fame - | of | Share this photo

    Lobsterman Kevin Magoon caught this odd-clawed creature off the coast of Rye, N.H. Photo by Kevin Magoon

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