PORTLAND PRESS HERALD DARKROOM
Wolfe’s neck

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    Wolfe’s neck - Photo courtesy of Wolfe’s Neck Center for Agriculture & the Environment | of | Share this photo

    Research coordinator Dorn Cox says good topsoil can grow quicker than generally thought.

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    Wolfe’s neck - Staff photo by Brianna Soukup | of | Share this photo

    The new sign at Wolfe's Neck Center for Agriculture & the Environment. The barn and back part of the 19th-century farmhouse were renovated in the past year

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    Wolfe’s neck - Staff photo by Brianna Soukup | of | Share this photo

    A sign explaining the transformation of the newly renamed Wolfe’s Neck Center for Agriculture & the Environment, with a new regenerative agriculture mission.

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    Wolfe’s neck - Staff photo by Brianna Soukup | of | Share this photo

    A camera and a water collecting jar can be seen on top of a shed near other equipment that the team at Wolfe's Neck Center for Agriculture & the Environment is using to gather data about the soil on the 626-acre farm.

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    Wolfe’s neck - Staff photo by Brianna Soukup | of | Share this photo

    David Herring, executive director, in a grazing field at the newly renamed Wolfe’s Neck Center for Agriculture & the Environment.

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    Wolfe’s neck - Staff photo by Brianna Soukup | of | Share this photo

    Pasture-raised chickens at Wolfe’s Neck Center for Agriculture & the Environment. The farm is still a place to go for a hayride in the fall or to see cute animals, but it’s also a laboratory for figuring out how to improve soils rapidly to fight global warming.

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    Wolfe’s neck - Staff photo by Brianna Soukup | of | Share this photo

    Executive director David Herring walks around the pen of some pasture-raised chickens. The farm is now heavily focused on Regenerative Agriculture, which includes using the soil on the 626-acre farm to combat climate change.

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    Wolfe’s neck - Photo courtesy of Wolfe’s Neck Center for Agriculture & the Environment | of | Share this photo

    Dorn Cox takes a soil sample.

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