Recent U.S. Department of Agriculture research has shown that white-fleshed peaches and nectarines are lower in acid than traditional yellow-fleshed varieties, according to a news release from the University of Maine Cooperative Extension in Orono. This means white-fleshed varieties are considered a low-acid food for canning purposes, and freezing is the only recommended method of preserving.

For more information, visit nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_02/peach_sliced.html.

USDA and UMMaine Extension canning recipes using peaches are only safe when using the yellow-fleshed variety.

USDA research also found that elderberries (Sambucus spp.) and their juice are low in acid and cannot be safely used in USDA- or UMaine Extension-recommended recipes that have been tested with other berries naturally high in acid, such as blueberries or blackberries. For more information, visit ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4859753.

Extension educator Kathy Savoie cautions that up-to-date information about canning methods and canning equipment is essential to ensure safe home food preservation.

More information is available on the Extension food preservation website at extension.umaine.edu/food-health/food-preservation or by calling 207-581-3188, 800-287-0274 in Maine.

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