PORTLAND PRESS HERALD DARKROOM
Can we manage garden pests without chemicals?

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    Can we manage garden pests without chemicals? - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    A bumblebee hovers near flowers on a Solomon’s seal plant in Cathy Chapman’s yard in South Portland. Careful plant selection can help keep pests at bay.

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    Can we manage garden pests without chemicals? - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Chapman uses various types of ground cover and native plants on her property instead of having a grassy lawn. Plants that attract pollinators and “good bugs” bring the green, minus a lot of mowing.

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    Can we manage garden pests without chemicals? - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Cathy Chapman carries arugula that has gone by out of her garden to her compost pile. Chapman rotates what she grows from year to year to keep the soil fertile and to keep pests at bay naturally.

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    Can we manage garden pests without chemicals? - Staff photo by Derek Davis | of | Share this photo

    David Melevsky, owner of Go Green Organic Land Care, treats grassy areas at Ocean Park Meadow condos. When managing pests and weeds organically, "you're looking to improve soil biology, which in turn feeds your grass and makes it more insect and drought resistant," Melevsky says.

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    Can we manage garden pests without chemicals? - Staff photo by Derek Davis | of | Share this photo

    Melevsky's work at at Ocean Park Meadow condos includes fertilizing grassy areas that have been reseeded to repair winter damage.

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    Can we manage garden pests without chemicals? - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Sweet alyssum waits to be planted in Chapman's backyard in South Portland. Chapman, who plants alternatives to a traditional lawn in her yard, uses the ground cover to attract bugs that eat aphids.

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    Can we manage garden pests without chemicals? - Staff photo by Derek Davis | of | Share this photo

    David Melevsky, owner of Go Green Organic Land Care, treats grassy areas with fertilizer at Ocean Park Meadow condos.

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    Can we manage garden pests without chemicals? - Staff photo by Derek Davis | of | Share this photo

    David Melevsky, owner of Go Green Organic Land Care, treats grassy areas with fertilizer at Ocean Park Meadow condos on June 7.

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    Can we manage garden pests without chemicals? - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Chapman uses various types of ground cover and native plant species for the backyard of her South Portland home instead of having just a grass lawn. Sometimes the best organic solution to a lackluster lawn – one that might otherwise require chemical fertilizers to grow – is no lawn at all.

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    Can we manage garden pests without chemicals? - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Dew drops remain on leaves of lady's mantle, a ground cover plant that Cathy Chapman uses in her South Portland backyard in place of grass.

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    Can we manage garden pests without chemicals? - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Cathy Chapman carries supplies past her South Portland garden while planting on June 6.

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    Can we manage garden pests without chemicals? - Staff photo by Gregory Rec | of | Share this photo

    Cathy Chapman harvests spinach from a garden box in her vegetable garden in South Portland. Chapman was removing the spinach and arugula, which were last year's crops in the box, so she could plant peppers in it this season. Chapman rotates what she grows in her garden boxes from year to year to keep the soil fertile and to help keep pests at bay naturally.

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