I just watched Sen. Susan Collins justify her decision to vote yes to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court (“Collins says she will vote to confirm Kavanaugh to Supreme Court,” Oct. 5). While she sounded very heartfelt, she carefully navigated around some of the key flaws in the process. The FBI did not (or were not allowed to) interview Kavanaugh or his accuser, Christine Ford, and they did not contact almost 30 witnesses who could have provided corroboration to the stories of two of the accusers or shown that Kavanaugh lied under oath. Also, Collins did not address the partisan, hostile and stonewalling behavior Kavanaugh exhibited during the hearing, never questioning its suitability in the temperament of a possible Supreme Court justice.

Collins joined the Republican leadership in trying to coat a thin veneer of credibility on an otherwise shabby and contrived process intended to do whatever was necessary to confirm Kavanaugh. This mission was illustrated beautifully by Mitch McConnell when he said the Senate will “plow right through” Ford’s sexual assault accusation and confirm Kavanaugh.

I recognize that McConnell and his cohort of mostly elite white men had made up their minds even before the hearings. As such, the investigation was designed to result in the outcome the elite white men intended, no matter how obviously flawed it was. Sadly, Collins jumped on that bandwagon.

Many — I hope most — Americans want to live in a country where sexual violence is treated with the seriousness it deserves, and where victims are treated with respect and support. I hope we all remember the message sent by Collins and the GOP in this situation when we vote for a better America, including the continued attempt to make this country a better place for the protection and healing of victims of sexual assault.

Mark Nordberg

Litchfield

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